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Definition of “soak” - English Dictionary

"soak" in American English

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soakverb

 us   /soʊk/
  • soak verb (MAKE WET)

[I/T] to make something very wet, or of a liquid to be absorbed: [T] The hikers got soaked in the downpour. [I] Water soaked through my shoes.
[I/T] To soak something means to leave it in liquid for a period of time, esp. to clean or soften it: [T] Let’s just soak the dishes.
  • soak verb (CHARGE)

[T] slang to charge someone too much money: I got soaked for the cab ride.
soaking
adjective  us   /ˈsoʊ·kɪŋ/ (also soaking wet,  /ˌsoʊ·kɪŋˈwet/ )
It’s so humid that my shirt is soaking wet before I leave the house.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of soak from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"soak" in British English

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soakverb

uk   /səʊk/  us   /soʊk/
C1 [I + adv/prep, T] to make something very wet, or (of liquid) to be absorbed in large amounts: The wind had blown the rain in and soaked the carpet. You'd better wipe up that red wine you've spilled before it soaks (= is absorbed) into the carpet. Blood had soaked through both bandages.
B2 [I or T] to leave something in liquid, especially in order to clean it, make it softer, or change its flavour: You can usually soak out a stain. Leave the beans to soak overnight./Let the beans soak overnight. Soak the fruit in brandy for a few hours before you add it to the mixture.
Phrasal verbs

soaknoun [C]

uk   /səʊk/  us   /soʊk/
  • soak noun [C] (PERSON)

old-fashioned informal a person who is often drunk
(Definition of soak from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of soak?
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