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Definition of “spoil” - English Dictionary

"spoil" in American English

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spoilverb

us   /spɔɪl/ past tense and past participle spoiled /spɔɪld/ spoilt /spɔɪlt/
  • spoil verb (DESTROY)

[I/T] to destroy or damage something, or to become destroyed or damaged: [T] The oil spill spoiled five miles of coastline. [T] Don’t tell me how it ends, you’ll spoil the movie for me. [I] Food spoils quickly in hot weather.
  • spoil verb (TREAT TOO WELL)

[T] to treat someone very well, esp. by being too generous: My vacation spoiled me. "We’re spoiling you," he said, handing her another cookie.
(Definition of spoil from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"spoil" in British English

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spoilverb

uk   /spɔɪl/ us   /spɔɪl/ spoiled or spoilt, spoiled or spoilt
  • spoil verb (DESTROY)

B1 [T] to destroy or reduce the pleasure, interest, or beauty of something: He tried not to let the bad news spoil his evening. The oil spill has spoiled the whole beautiful coastline. I haven't seen the film, so don't spoil it for me by telling me what happens. You'll spoil your appetite for dinner if you have a cake now.
[I or T] When food spoils or is spoiled, it is no longer good enough to eat: The dessert will spoil if you don't keep it in the fridge.
[T] UK specialized politics to mark a ballot paper so that it cannot be officially counted as a vote: Since she supported none of the candidates, she spoiled her ballot paper.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

spoilnoun

uk   /spɔɪl/ us   /spɔɪl/
(Definition of spoil from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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