square Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “square” - English Dictionary

Definition of "square" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

squarenoun [C]

 us   /skweər/

square noun [C] (SHAPE)

geometry a ​flatshape with four ​sides of ​equallength and four ​angles of 90°, or an ​area or ​object having this ​shape

square noun [C] (PLACE)

a ​smallarea of ​openland in a ​city or ​town, often one in the ​shape of a square

square noun [C] (PERSON)

dated slang a ​person who is ​old-fashioned

square noun [C] (RESULT OF MULTIPLYING)

the ​result of ​multiplying a ​number by itself: The square of 7 is 49.

squareadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /skwer, skwær/

square adjective [-er/-est only] (EQUAL)

having all ​debtspaid or other ​mattersarrangedfairly: I ​paid last ​time, so if you ​pay now, we’re square.square deal A square ​deal is a ​fairagreement: All I ​want is a square ​deal.

square adjective [-er/-est only] (SHAPE)

having four ​sides of ​equallength and four ​angles of 90°: They set up the square ​cardtables for the ​bridgeplayers. (abbreviation sq) A square ​unit of ​measurement is an ​area that is a ​particulardistancewide and the same ​distancelong: The ​box was three ​feet square. The ​correctfigure is 900 sq ​miles.

squareverb [T]

 us   /skwer, skwær/

square verb [T] (MULTIPLY)

mathematics to ​multiply a ​number by itself: Ten squared ​equals a hundred.
(Definition of square from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "square" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

squarenoun [C]

uk   /skweər/  us   /skwer/

square noun [C] (SHAPE)

A2 a ​flatshape with four ​sides of ​equallength and four ​angles of 90°: First ​draw a square. It's a square-shaped ​room.A2 any square-shaped ​object: When ​cooled, ​cut the ​chocolatebrownies into squares.A2 an ​area of ​approximately square-shaped ​land in a ​city or a ​town, often ​including the ​buildings that ​surround it: Are they still ​living at 6 Eaton Square? A ​band were ​playing in the ​town square. a ​particularspace on a ​board used for ​playinggames: She ​moved her ​castleforward three squares. US a ​tool for ​drawing or ​testing a right angle
More examples

square noun [C] (BORING PERSON)

old-fashioned informal a ​boringperson who does not like new and ​excitingideas: He's a ​bit of a square.

square noun [C] (MULTIPLY)

the ​result of ​multiplying a ​number by itself: The square of 7 is 49.

squareadjective

uk   /skweər/  us   /skwer/

square adjective (SHAPE)

A2 having the ​shape of a square: The ​reciperecommends that you use a square ​caketin. He's got that square-jawed ​masculinity that a lot of women ​seem to ​findattractive. (written abbreviation sq., symbol 2) used with ​units of ​measurement of ​length to ​express the ​totalsize of an ​area: The ​floor is 3 m ​wide by 5 m ​long, so ​itstotalarea is 15 sq m. The ​city itself ​covers 13 square ​miles. Ensure that the ​exposedarea is less than 2 cm2. Square is used ​immediately after ​measurements of ​length when ​expressing the ​length of the four ​sides of a square-shaped ​area: So you ​wantcarpet for a ​room that's eight ​metres square (= eight ​metreslong and eight ​metreswide).
More examples

square adjective (EQUAL)

informal equal or ​level: Could you ​stand back from these ​shelves and ​tell me if they're square (= ​level)?(all) square informal If two ​people are all square, one of them has ​paid off a ​debt to the other and neither now ​owes or is ​owed any ​money. If two ​teams or ​players are (all) square, they have an ​equalnumber of ​goals or ​points: They're all square at 30 ​points each.

square adjective (STRAIGHT)

in a ​straightline

square adjective (BORING PERSON)

old-fashioned informal used to ​describe a ​person who is ​boring and does not like new and ​exciting things: Do you ​think my new ​haircut makes me ​look a ​bit square?

squareverb

uk   /skweər/  us   /skwer/

square verb (MULTIPLY)

[T] to ​multiply a ​number by itself: 10 squared ​equals a hundred. 42means four squared, and ​equals 16.

square verb (SHAPE)

square your shoulders to ​pullyourshoulders up and back because you ​feeldetermined to do something: He squared his ​shoulders and took a ​deepbreath before ​diving into the ​pool.
(Definition of square from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "square" - Business English Dictionary

See all translations

squareadjective

uk   us   /skweər/ (written abbreviation UK sq, written abbreviation US sq.)
MEASURES, PROPERTY used before ​units of ​measurement to describe the ​size of an ​area, especially an ​area of ​land. An ​area of 100 square ​metres is ​equal in ​size to 100 squares with ​sides that are 1 ​metrelong: 100 square metres/kilometres/miles, etc. About 81,000 square ​metres of ​officespace is ​due to be completed in the City this ​year.100 square feet/foot/inches, etc. The ​house has 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms in about 4,700 square ​feet. New Jersey has an ​average of well over 1,000 ​people per square ​mile. Permeable concrete ​costs about $9 per square ​foot.
[after noun] MEASURES used after ​units of ​measurement to describe the ​size of an ​area. An ​area of 10 ​metres square is ​equal in ​size to a square with ​sides that are 10 ​metreslong, or ​equal to 100 square ​metres: 10 metres/feet/foot, etc. square We will ​deliveritems to a ​maximumsize of three ​feet square.10 miles/kilometres, etc. square The city has a ​population of 1 million crammed into an ​area only a few ​miles square.
be (all) square to be in a ​situation in which everyone or everything is ​equal and no one has an ​advantage over anyone else: Dealers ​claim that after Wednesday's bout of profit-taking, the ​market is 'all square' again. if ​people are all square, all ​debts between them have been ​paid and no one ​owes or is ​owed any ​money: If I give you another $5, then we're all square.

squarenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /skweər/
the ​result of ​multiplying a ​number by itself: The square of 7 is 49.
be back to square one informal to not have made any ​progress after ​trying to ​succeed or ​achieve something: While congestion ​charging had an ​initialimpact, many cities are almost back to square one in ​terms of ​trafficvolumes.
See also

squareverb

uk   us   /skweər/
[T] FINANCE to ​reach an ​agreement with someone: square sth with sb The company's full-year ​results will be ​postponed until it has squared a new ​agreement with its ​lenders. A state-owned ​bank had to be ​brought in, in ​order to square the ​deal.
[I] (also square up) if two things that should be the same do not square, they seem different or show different ​results: A Superior Court ​judgeruled that the ​tape and the ​officers' ​reports "didn't square".
square the books ACCOUNTING to make sure that you have ​paid all the ​money you ​owe, or that you have received all the ​money that other ​peopleowe you: Currency ​traders are squaring their ​booksahead of the ​longholidayweekend.
square the circle to solve a very difficult ​situation or problem: He will have to square the circle of how to ​sell at ​currentprices while ​cutting the ​cost of ​production to make a ​profit.
(Definition of square from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of square?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

golden

made of gold

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More