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Definition of “stamp” - English Dictionary

"stamp" in American English

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stampverb [I/T]

us   /stæmp/
to hit the floor or ground hard with a foot, usually making a loud noise: [T] She stood by the road, stamping her feet to stay warm. [I] I wish those people upstairs would stop stamping around.

stampnoun [C]

us   /stæmp, stɑmp/
the act of hitting the floor or ground hard with a foot: With a stamp of her foot she hurried out.

stampnoun

us   /stæmp/
  • stamp noun (MAIL)

[C] also postage stamp a small piece of paper, usually with a colorful design, that is attached to a package or envelope to show that the charge for sending it through the mail has been paid: The new stamps depict blues singers.
  • stamp noun (MARK)

[C] a tool for printing or cutting a mark into an object, or the mark made by such a tool: The guard examined the permit, then reached for his rubber stamp. The stamp on the rim shows that Paul Revere made this mug.
  • stamp noun (QUALITY)

[U] a particular quality or character: This painting clearly bears the stamp of genius.

stampverb [T]

us   /stæmp/
  • stamp verb [T] (MARK)

to use a special tool to print or cut a mark into an object: An immigration official stamped his passport. fig. That scene will be stamped in my memory forever.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of stamp from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"stamp" in British English

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stampnoun

uk   /stæmp/ us   /stæmp/
  • stamp noun (LETTER)

A2 formal postage stamp [C] a small piece of paper with a picture or pattern on it that is stuck onto a letter or package before it is posted, to show that the cost of sending it has been paid: I stuck a 50p stamp on the envelope.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • stamp noun (MARK)

[C] a tool for putting a mark on an object either by printing on it or pushing into it, or the mark made in this way: A date stamp inside the front cover of a library book shows when it should be returned.
  • stamp noun (PROOF OF PAYMENT)

UK [C] a small piece of paper worth a particular amount of money that you can buy several of, as a way of paying for something over a period of time: vehicle licence stamps
  • stamp noun (QUALITY)

[U] a particular quality in something or someone, or a quality in something that shows it was done by a particular person or group of people: Although this painting clearly bears the stamp of genius, we don't know who painted it. Each manager has left his or her own stamp on the way the company has evolved.

stampverb

uk   /stæmp/ us   /stæmp/
  • stamp verb (MARK)

B2 [T] to put a mark on an object either by printing on it or pushing into it with a small tool: It is necessary to stamp your passport. Every carton of yogurt is stamped with a sell-by date.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • stamp verb (MOVE FOOT)

C2 [I or T] US also stomp to put a foot down on the ground hard and quickly, making a loud noise, often to show anger: The little boy was stamping his foot and refusing to take his medicine. She stood by the road, stamping her feet to stay warm. I wish those people upstairs would stop stamping (about/around). Why did you stamp on that insect?
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(Definition of stamp from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stamp" in Business English

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stampnoun [C]

uk   /stæmp/ us   COMMUNICATIONS
also formal postage stamp a small piece of paper with a picture or pattern on it, that you stick onto a letter or package to pay for the cost of mailing it: first-class/second-class stamp
a tool used to put a date, an address, or other mark on a document or an object, usually as proof of something: The assistant uses a stamp to sign his boss's name.
an official mark put on something that shows a date, an address, or other information: Look for the official USDA stamp before you buy.
stamp of approval
approval from someone in a position of authority: The Board will meet Thursday to discuss the contract and is likely to give its stamp of approval Friday. The foreign-made goods still have not earned the government's stamp of approval.

stampverb [T]

uk   /stæmp/ us   COMMUNICATIONS
to use a tool to put a date, an address, or other mark on a document or an object, usually as proof of something: EU citizens don't need to get their passports stamped when travelling within Europe.stamp sth on sth All supermarket food packaging has a sell-by date stamped on it.stamp sth with sth The invoice was stamped with the date that payment had been received.
See also
(Definition of stamp from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“stamp” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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