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Definition of “standard” - English Dictionary

"standard" in American English

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standardadjective

 us   /ˈstæn·dərd/
  • standard adjective (USUAL)

usual or expected; not involving something special or extra: a standard contract I don’t work a standard, 35-hour week. The car came with an air conditioner and tape player as standard equipment. This is a standard medical text (= a commonly used medical book).
A standard unit of measurement is an accepted method of measuring things of a similar type.

standardnoun [C]

 us   /ˈstæn·dərd/
  • standard noun [C] (LEVEL OF QUALITY)

something that others of a similar type are compared to or measured by, or the expected level of quality: moral/ethical/community standards That’s not their usual standard of service. The new standard will allow data to be sent over telephone wires at higher speeds.
  • standard noun [C] (SONG)

a song or piece of music that has been popular for many years and that musicians often perform
  • standard noun [C] (FLAG)

a flag used as the symbol of a person, group, or organization: Pete carried the troop’s standard in the parade.
(Definition of standard from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"standard" in British English

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standardnoun

uk   /ˈstæn.dəd/  us   /ˈstæn.dɚd/
  • standard noun (QUALITY)

B2 [C or U] a level of quality: This essay is not of an acceptable standard - do it again. This piece of work is below standard/is not up to standard. We have very high safety standards in this laboratory. Not everyone judges success by the same standards - some people think happiness is more important than money. Her technique became a standard against which all future methods were compared.
C2 [C usually plural] a moral rule that should be obeyed: Most people agree that there are standards (of behaviour) that need to be upheld.

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  • standard noun (FLAG)

[C] a flag, especially a long, narrow one ending with two long points: the royal standard

standardadjective

uk   /ˈstæn.dəd/  us   /ˈstæn.dɚd/
B2 usual rather than special, especially when thought of as being correct or acceptable: White is the standard colour for this model of refrigerator. These are standard procedures for handling radioactive waste. The metre is the standard unit for measuring length in the SI system.mainly UK Your new TV comes with a two year guarantee as standard.
See also
Language described as standard is the form of that language that is considered acceptable and correct by most educated users of it: Most announcers on the BBC speak standard English. In Standard American, "gotten" is used as a past participle of "get".
[before noun] A standard book or writer is the one that is most commonly read for information on a particular subject: Her book is still a standard text in archaeology, even though it was written more than 20 years ago.

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(Definition of standard from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"standard" in Business English

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standardnoun

uk   us   /ˈstændəd/
[C or U] a level of quality that people expect and generally accept as normal: basic/high/low standard Their Customer Services is generally of a very high standard. Online form-completion is fast becoming the standard.achieve/meet/set a standard Banks in Hong Kong and China are setting the standard for customer service in call centres. Customers have witnessed the standard of services decline while the profitability of the banks has escalated.by sb's/sth's standards At $80,000, the house is a bargain by American standards. The new probe is modest by modern space technology standards.below/up to standard The electrical equipment was not up to standard. falling/rising standards improve/lower/raise standards
[C] ( written abbreviation std.) MEASURES an official rule, unit of measurement, or way of operating that is used in a particular area of manufacturing or services: a common/a global/an international standard MP3 is a recognized global standard for audio encoding and compression. an accountancy/industry/legal standard Several states were given notice that they do not meet the standard for ozone levels. safety standards a federal/government/national standard enforce/tighten standards

standardadjective

uk   us   /ˈstændəd/
normal or average: The price quoted is for the standard size.standard practice/procedure The board has been careful to follow standard procedures and employment law. The current model comes with all these extra features as standard.
( written abbreviation std.) MEASURES following a particular set of rules or measurements, without any changes or added details: standard contract/letter/replystandard format/size Candidates need to enter their expenditure records in a standard format on a Web-based form.
Compare
[before noun] used by most people: It has become the standard text for all trainee accountants.
(Definition of standard from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“standard” in Business English

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