steal Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “steal” - English Dictionary

"steal" in American English

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stealverb [I/T]

 us   /stil/ (past tense stole  /stoʊl/ , past participle stolen  /ˈstoʊ·lən/ )
  • steal verb [I/T] (TAKE AWAY)

to take something without the ​permission or ​knowledge of the ​owner and ​keep it or use it: [T] They ​broke into ​cars to steal the ​radios. [T] He never ​paid me back, so ​basically he ​ended up stealing a hundred ​dollars from me. To steal is also to do something ​quickly while ​trying not to be ​seen doing it: [I always + adv/prep] to steal out of a ​room [T] She stole a ​glance at her ​watch.

stealnoun [C]

 us   /stil/ infml
  • steal noun [C] (CHEAP ITEM)

something ​obtained at a much ​lowerprice than ​itstruevalue: At ​half the ​originalprice, that ​designerdress is a steal.
(Definition of steal from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"steal" in British English

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stealverb [I or T]

uk   us   /stiːl/ (stole, stolen)
A2 to take something without the ​permission or ​knowledge of the ​owner and ​keep it: She ​admitted stealing the ​money from her ​employers. The ​number of ​cars which are stolen every ​year has ​risen. They were so ​poor they had to steal in ​order to ​eat.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

to do something ​quickly or without being ​noticed: She stole a ​glance at her ​watch. He stole out of the ​room while no one was ​looking.

stealnoun [S]

uk   us   /stiːl/ mainly US informal
a ​product that has a very ​lowprice, or a ​price that is much ​lower than the ​originalcost: I ​picked up a new ​iron in the ​sale - it was a steal.
(Definition of steal from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"steal" in Business English

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stealverb [I or T]

uk   us   /stiːl/ (stole, stolen)
to take something without the ​permission of its ​owner: Employees who steal are ​dismissedautomatically. The ​number of ​cars which are stolen every ​year has ​risen.steal (sth) from sb She ​admitted stealing the ​money from her ​employers.
steal a march on sb to get an ​advantage over someone by ​acting before they do: Our ​chiefcompetitormanaged to steal a march on us by ​bringing out their ​softwareahead of ours.

stealnoun [S]

uk   us   /stiːl/ FINANCE
a ​product that has a very ​lowprice, or a ​price that is much ​lower than the ​originalcost: The ​shares may be a steal, but ​investors should remain wary. Their ​financialcommitment for the ​land will be around $600,000, which Peter considers a steal.
(Definition of steal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“steal” in Business English

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