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Definition of “string” - English Dictionary

"string" in American English

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stringnoun

us   /strɪŋ/
  • string noun (CORD)

[C/U] a thin length of cord: [U] a piece of string
  • string noun (MUSIC)

[C] a thin wire or cord that is stretched across a musical instrument and produces musical notes when pulled or hit: Guitar strings are made from steel or nylon.
[C] The strings in an orchestra is a group of instruments that produce sound with strings: Violins, cellos, and double basses are all strings.
  • string noun (SET)

[C] a set of objects joined together in a row on a single cord or thread: a string of pearls
  • string noun (SERIES)

[C] a series of related things or events: He told the committee a string of lies. Her new novel is the latest in a string of successes.

stringverb [T]

us   /strɪŋ/ past tense and past participle strung /strʌŋ/
  • string verb [T] (ATTACH CORD)

to attach a length of string or something similar by the ends, so that the middle hangs: They strung ribbons of bright paper around the room in preparation for the party.
  • string verb [T] (JOIN IN SET)

to put a thread or cord through each of a set of things: The child sat on the floor, stringing wooden beads. fig. I can just barely string together (= say) a couple of sentences in Japanese.
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"string" in British English

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stringnoun

uk   /strɪŋ/ us   /strɪŋ/
  • string noun (ROPE)

B2 [C or U] (a piece of) strong, thin rope made by twisting very thin threads together, used for fastening and tying things: a package tied with string a ball/piece of string When you pull the strings, the puppet's arms and legs move.
[C] a set of objects joined together in a row on a single rope or thread: a string of beads/pearls A string of onions hung from a beam in the kitchen.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • string noun (SERIES)

C2 [C] a series of related things or events: What do you think of the recent string of political scandals? He had a string of top-20 hits during the 80s.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • string noun (MUSIC)

B2 [C] a thin wire that is stretched across a musical instrument and is used to produce a range of notes depending on its thickness, length, and tightness: A violin has four strings. Guitar strings are made from steel or nylon. You can pluck the strings on a guitar with your fingers or a plectrum. a twelve-string guitar
strings [plural]
the group of instruments that have strings and are played with a bow or with the fingers, or the players in a musical group who play these instruments: I prefer his compositions for strings. He played the cello and joined the strings in the school orchestra.
  • string noun (SPORT)

[C] one of the thin plastic strings that are stretched between the sides of the frame of a racket used in sport

stringadjective

uk   /strɪŋ/ us   /strɪŋ/

stringverb [T]

uk   /strɪŋ/ us   /strɪŋ/ strung, strung
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"string" in Business English

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stringnoun [C]

uk   /strɪŋ/ us  
pull strings
also US pull wires to use your power or influence to get what you want: She became a journalist for one of the UK's top newspapers after her father pulled strings.
pull the strings
the person who pulls the strings in a particular organization, situation, etc. makes the important decisions about it and controls it: Shareholders are concerned because they no longer really know who is pulling the strings at the bank.
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“string” in Business English

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