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Definition of “strip” - English Dictionary

"strip" in American English

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stripverb

 us   /strɪp/ (-pp-)
  • strip verb (REMOVE COVERING)

[T] to ​remove, ​pull, or ​tear the ​covering or ​outerlayer from something: I have this ​cabinet that had about eight ​layers of ​paint on it, and I stripped it down to refinish it.
[T] If you strip someone of something, you ​remove it from that ​person: Canada ​wants to strip Luitjens, a ​retired University of British Columbia ​botanyinstructor, of his ​citizenship.
  • strip verb (REMOVE CLOTHING)

[I/T] to ​removeyourclothes, or to ​remove the ​clothes from someone ​else: [M] It was so ​hot that we stripped off ​ourshirts. [I] We were told to strip to the ​waist (= ​removeourclothes above the ​waist). [I] The ​nurse told me to strip down to my ​underwear (= ​remove all of my ​clothes except my ​underwear).

stripnoun

 us   /strɪp/
  • strip noun (PIECE)

[C] a ​long, ​flat, ​narrowpiece: a strip of ​land He didn’t have a ​bandage, so he ​ripped up his ​shirt into ​thin strips. To ​prolong the ​workinglife of ​yourcreditcard, ​keep the ​magnetic strip ​protected from ​scratches, ​heat, and ​moisture.
  • strip noun (REMOVAL OF CLOTHING)

[U] the ​act of ​removingyourclothes, esp. as an ​entertainment: I ​jumped on the ​table and ​started to do a strip.
(Definition of strip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"strip" in British English

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stripverb

uk   /strɪp/  us   /strɪp/ (-pp-)
  • strip verb (REMOVE CLOTHING)

[I or T] (UK also strip off [I]) to ​removeyourclothing, or to ​remove all the ​clothing of someone ​else: The men were ​ordered to strip.UK Suddenly he stripped off and ​ran into the ​sea. [+ adj] He had been stripped naked, ​beaten and ​robbed.
[I] to ​removeyourclothing as an ​entertainment: She stripped to ​pay her way through ​college.
  • strip verb (REMOVE PARTS)

[T] to ​removeparts of a ​machine, ​vehicle, or ​engine in ​order to ​clean or ​repair it: I've ​decided to strip down my ​motorbike and ​rebuild it.
[T] mainly US to ​remove the ​parts of a ​car, etc. in ​order to ​sell them

stripnoun

uk   /strɪp/  us   /strɪp/
(Definition of strip from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"strip" in Business English

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stripverb [T]

uk   us   /strɪp/ (-pp-)
FINANCE to ​remove the ​interestpayments from a ​bond and ​sell them separately from the ​originalbond: Certain of these securities may have ​variableinterestrates and others may be stripped.
(also strip sth down) to ​separate a ​machine or ​piece of ​equipment into ​separateparts in ​order to ​clean or ​repair it: Apprentices are taught how to strip and ​repair machinery.

stripnoun [C]

uk   us   /strɪp/ (also strip mall) US COMMERCE
a row of ​stores and ​smallbusinessesbuilt together along the ​side of a ​main road: commercial/​retail strips
(Definition of strip from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“strip” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

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