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Definition of “stroke” - English Dictionary

"stroke" in American English

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strokeverb [T]

 us   /stroʊk/
  • stroke verb [T] (TOUCH)

to move ​yourhand or an ​objectgently over something, usually ​repeatedly: Asked another ​question, she stroked her ​chin and ​shut her ​eyes before ​answering.

strokenoun

 us   /stroʊk/
  • stroke noun (MARK)

[C] a ​movement of a ​pen or ​pencil when writing, or by a ​brush when ​painting, or the ​line or ​mark made by such a ​movement: With a stroke of his ​pen, the ​governorsigned the ​bill into ​law.
  • stroke noun (ILLNESS)

[C] a ​suddenchange in the ​bloodsupply to a ​part of the ​brain, which can ​result in a ​loss of some ​mental or ​physicalabilities, or ​death: He ​suffered a stroke and ​died two ​dayslater.
  • stroke noun (SWIMMING ACTION)

[C/U] a ​particulartype of ​repeatedmovement used in a ​method of ​swimming: [U] He ​swims the ​breast stroke competitively, but for his ​ads he did the ​butterfly stroke.
  • stroke noun (EVENT)

[C] an ​unexpected but ​importantevent or ​experience: The ​bid to take over the ​company was ​seen as a ​bold stroke. To get a ​job in those ​years was an ​incredible stroke of ​luck.
  • stroke noun (TIME)

[C] an ​exacttime, or a ​sound or ​series of ​sounds that show this ​time: The ​fireworks will ​start at the stroke of 10.
(Definition of stroke from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"stroke" in British English

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strokenoun

uk   /strəʊk/  us   /stroʊk/
  • stroke noun (ILLNESS)

B2 [C] a ​suddenchange in the ​bloodsupply to a ​part of the ​brain, sometimes ​causing a ​loss of the ​ability to ​moveparticularparts of the ​body: She suffered/had a stroke that ​left her ​unable to ​speak.

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  • stroke noun (HIT)

[C] an ​act of ​hitting a ​ball when ​playing a ​sport: She ​returned the ​volley with a ​powerful stroke to ​win the ​game.
[C] old-fashioned an ​act of ​hitting someone with a ​weapon: The ​punishment was 20 strokes of the ​lash.
  • stroke noun (CLOCK SOUND)

[C] one of the ​sounds that some ​clocks make at ​particulartimes, ​especially by ​ringing a ​bellonce for each ​number of the ​hour: How many strokes did you ​count?
  • stroke noun (TOUCH)

[C] mainly UK an ​act of ​movingyourhand, another ​part of the ​body, or an ​objectgently over something or someone, usually ​repeatedly and for ​pleasure: Don't be ​frightened, just give the ​horse a stroke.

strokeverb [T]

uk   /strəʊk/  us   /stroʊk/
  • stroke verb [T] (TOUCH)

B2 to ​move a ​hand, another ​part of the ​body, or an ​objectgently over something or someone, usually ​repeatedly and for ​pleasure: Stroke the ​dog if you ​want, he won't ​bite. She ​lovingly stroked Chris's ​face with the ​tips of her ​fingers.

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(Definition of stroke from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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