Definition of “stuck” - English Dictionary

“stuck” in English

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stuckverb

uk /stʌk/ us /stʌk/

past simple and past participle of stick

stuckadjective

uk /stʌk/ us /stʌk/

B2 unable to move, or set in a particular position, place, or way of thinking:

This door seems to be stuck - can you help me push it open?
Seven of us were stuck in the lift for over an hour.
I hate being stuck (= having to be) behind a desk - I'd rather work outside.

in a difficult situation, or unable to change or get away from a situation:

We'd be stuck if your sister hadn't offered to come over and look after the children tonight.

C1 not able to continue reading, answering questions, etc. because something is too difficult:

I'm really stuck - do you have any idea how to answer these questions?
be stuck with sb/sth

C2 to have to deal with someone or something unpleasant because you have no choice or because no one else wants to:

We were stuck with him for the entire journey!

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(Definition of “stuck” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“stuck” in American English

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stuck

us /stʌk/

stuck (STICK)

past simple and past participle of stick

stuckadjective [ not gradable ]

us /stʌk/

unable to move from a particular position or place, or unable to change a situation:

This door seems to be stuck.
I hate being stuck at a desk all day.
Ty got stuck with doing the laundry.

(Definition of “stuck” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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stuck

The latter can afford to run a higher deficit on a short-term basis, and should not be punished for having stuck to the rules in the past.
The fight against poverty should not get stuck on the desks of statistics offices but should go down to the administrative level closest to the women who need them.
We have stuck to this all year.
There is no point in responding 20 days or two months later, because then the myth has become stuck in reality.
I think it would be conducive to greater overall efficiency if we stuck to a basic programme and stopped changing arrangements at short notice.
Because we have to face the fact that bank lending is limited by their capital and they are stuck until either more capital is raised or the loan sold on.
As an inquiry has shown that the ship is stuck on a sandbank, it would be relatively easy to recover the bodies with the aid of sub-aqua divers.
At times it seems it is like an ostrich with its head stuck in the sand trying to ignore all the problems around it.
In this case, it should not be about punishing those who find themselves stuck in congestion but about coming up with constructive solutions to help prevent it.
I wonder where we would end up if there were no agreement, if we stuck with a sort of status quo?