style Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “style” - English Dictionary

"style" in American English

See all translations

stylenoun

 us   /stɑɪl/
  • style noun (WAY)

[C/U] a way of doing something, esp. one that is ​typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​time: [C] Puente ​fusedLatin with other ​musical styles. [C] The ​book is written in the style of an 18th-century ​novel. [U] His ​portraits were ​awkward in style. [C/U] Style is also a ​specialquality that makes a ​person or thing ​seem different and ​attractive: [U] I like this ​team – the ​players have style.
  • style noun (DESIGN)

[C] a ​particularform or ​design: They had hundreds of styles of ​lightfixtures in ​stock. [C] Style also ​meansfashion: [C] I ​keep up with the ​latest styles. [U] The ​classicblackdress is always in style. art [C] Style also refers to ​particularfeatures of ​art that are ​found in a ​group of ​artists who ​lived and ​worked at the same ​time.

styleverb [T]

 us   /stɑɪl/
  • style verb [T] (DESIGN)

to ​arrange or ​designhair, ​clothes, a ​room, etc., esp. so that it ​looksattractive: Most women style ​theirhair.
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"style" in British English

See all translations

stylenoun

uk   us   /staɪl/
  • style noun (WAY)

B1 [C or U] a way of doing something, ​especially one that is ​typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​period: Jones ​favours a ​dynamic, ​hands-on style ofmanagement. His ​office is very ​utilitarian in style, with no ​decoration.be your style informal to be the ​type of thing that you would do: He wouldn't ​try to ​mislead you - it's not his style.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • style noun (FASHION)

B1 [C or U] fashion, ​especially in ​clothing: a style ​consultant I ​read the ​fashionpages in the ​newspapers to ​keep up with the ​latest styles. The ​classicblackdress is always in style.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • style noun (DESIGN)

B1 [C] a ​particularshape or ​design, ​especially of a person's ​hair, ​clothes, or a ​piece of ​furniture: a ​formal style ofhat Her ​hair was ​cut in a really ​nice style.
See also

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • style noun (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 [U] approving high ​quality in ​appearance, ​design, or ​behaviour: That ​car's got ​real style, which is no ​surpriseconsidering how much it ​cost. When she ​decides to do something, she always does it in/withgreat style.

styleverb [T]

uk   us   /staɪl/
  • style verb [T] (DESIGN)

to ​shape or ​design something such as a person's ​hair or an ​object like a ​piece of ​clothing or ​furniture, ​especially so that it ​looksattractive: You've had ​yourhair styled - it really ​suits you. This ​range of ​jackets is styled to ​look good whatever the ​occasion.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • style verb [T] (TITLE)

to give a ​title to a ​person or ​group: [+ noun] She styles herself "Doctor" but she doesn't have a ​degree.
See also

-stylesuffix

uk   us   /-staɪl/
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"style" in Business English

See all translations

stylenoun [C]

uk   us   /staɪl/
a way of doing something, especially one that is typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​period: management/leadership style An authoritarian ​management style may not ​yield good ​results. Those familiar with her personal style say she is quietly decisive. a working/​learning style
See also
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of style?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

procession

a line of people who are all walking or travelling in the same direction, especially in a formal way as part of a religious ceremony or public celebration

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More