sub Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “sub” - English Dictionary

Definition of "sub" - American English Dictionary

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subnoun [C]

 us   /sʌb/

sub noun [C] (REPLACEMENT)

short form of substitute teacher

sub noun [C] (SHIP)

short form of submarine : a ​nuclear sub

sub noun [C] (FOOD)

short form of submarine (sandwich)

subverb [I]

 us   /sʌb/ (-bb-)
to ​work as a ​substituteteacher: She subs at three ​schools.
(Definition of sub from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "sub" - British English Dictionary

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subnoun [C]

uk   us   /sʌb/ informal

sub noun [C] (REPLACEMENT)

in ​sports, a ​player who is used for ​part of a ​gameinstead of another: One of the ​players was ​injured during the ​match, so a sub was ​brought on.
Synonym
US a ​teacher who ​replacesteachers who are ​absent from ​work: A ​trainedteacher, he ​foundwork as a sub which ​fit around his other ​commitments.

sub noun [C] (SHIP)

a ​ship that can ​travel under ​water: a ​nuclear sub
Synonym

sub noun [C] (MONEY)

UK an ​amount of ​money that you ​payregularly to be a ​member of an ​organization or ​club: Have you ​paidyourtennisclub sub ​yet?
Synonym

sub noun [C] (SANDWICH)

US a ​long, ​thin loaf of ​breadfilled with ​meat or ​cheese, and often ​lettuce, ​tomatoes, etc: a ​meatball sub

subverb

uk   us   /sʌb/ (-bb-) informal
[I] in ​sports, to ​play in a ​match in someone's ​place: Travis subbed for the ​injureddefender. [I] US to do a ​jobtemporarily when someone ​else cannot do it: As a ​youngplayer, he subbed for Duke Ellington's ​drummer. I subbed as a ​teacher for a ​semester. [T] UK to ​replace one ​player with another during a ​game: He was subbed in the ​match against Newcastle.

sub-prefix

uk   us   /sʌb-/

sub prefix (LESS THAN)

less than a ​number or ​level: Winter ​weatherbroughtsub-zero (= less than 0 ​degrees)temperatures to much of the ​country. smart TVs in the sub-$1000 ​pricerange the first man to ​run a sub-4 ​minutemile

sub prefix (LOWER)

below or in a ​lowerposition: the ​subarctic a sub-layer

sub prefix (NOT QUITE)

almost or ​nearly: subtropical

sub prefix (SMALLER)

being a ​smallerpart of a ​largerwhole: a ​subcontinent a ​subcommitteemeeting to ​subdivide

sub prefix (LESS GOOD)

not as good as: subhuman a sub-standard ​effort The ​film is a ​sort of sub-Godfather ​mafiafamilytale.

sub prefix (LESS IMPORTANT)

less ​important or ​lower in ​rank: a sub-deacon a ​subordinate
(Definition of sub from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "sub" - Business English Dictionary

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subnoun [C]

uk   us   /sʌb/ informal
→  subscription : You can ​save up to £20 if you ​pay your subs by ​directdebit.
→  substitute noun : There is a great need both for ​permanent teachers and subs.
payment that your ​employer gives you earlier than usual because you need ​money: I ​ran out of ​money on Thursday and had to ​ask my ​boss for a sub.

subverb [T]

uk   us   /sʌb/ (-bb-)
to ​pay an ​employee earlier than usual because they need ​money: He subbed him his ​wages because he had to ​buy a ​planeticket.
(Definition of sub from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sub” in American English

“sub” in Business English

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