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Definition of “subject” - English Dictionary

"subject" in American English

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subjectnoun [C]

 us   /ˈsʌb·dʒɪkt, -dʒekt/
  • subject noun [C] (AREA OF DISCUSSION)

something that is being discussed or considered: School officials broached the subject of extending the school year. It seemed like a good idea to change the subject.
  • subject noun [C] (SCHOOL COURSE)

an area of knowledge that is studied in school or college: My favorite subjects are history and geography.
  • subject noun [C] (PERSON)

a person who lives or who has the right to live in a particular country, esp. a country with a king or queen: a British subject
  • subject noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

grammar the person or thing that performs the action of a verb, or which is joined to a description by a verb: "Bob" is the subject of the sentence, "Bob threw the ball."
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"subject" in British English

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subjectnoun [C]

uk   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/  us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/
  • subject noun [C] (AREA OF DISCUSSION)

B1 the thing that is being discussed, considered, or studied: Our subject for discussion is homelessness. She has made a series of documentaries on the subject of family relationships. The guest lecturer took as her subject (= decided to speak about) "punishment and imprisonment in modern society". The number of planes flying over the town has been the subject of (= has caused) concern since last summer.

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  • subject noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

B1 specialized language the person or thing that performs the action of a verb, or is joined to a description by a verb: "Bob" is the subject of the sentence "Bob threw the ball."
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  • subject noun [C] (PERSON)

a person who lives in or who has the right to live in a particular country, especially a country with a king or queen: He is a British subject.
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Grammar

subjectverb [T]

uk   /səbˈdʒekt/  us   /səbˈdʒekt/
to defeat people or a country and then control them against their wishes and limit their freedom: The invaders quickly subjected the local tribes.
Phrasal verbs

subjectadjective

uk   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/  us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"subject" in Business English

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subjectadjective

uk   us   /ˈsʌbdʒɪkt/
subject to sth
likely to have or experience a particular thing, especially something unpleasant: be subject to a charge/fee/tariff You may be subject to additional bank charges for currency conversion. The company could be subject to a hostile takeover. Income from investment of the capital will be subject to tax.
depending on the stated thing happening: The $1.14 billion project is subject to approval by the board. Outline planning permission has been granted, subject to a public inquiry, for a new 10,000-seat stadium on the land. Tax laws are subject to change. The notice period for clients to leave the agency are subject to contract.
under the political control or authority of something: The casinos are located on tribal lands not subject to state or local laws.
subject to average
INSURANCE used about an insurance agreement when the amount of insurance on a property is less than the real value of the property, so the amount paid out by the company will be reduced: You must adequately insure yourself otherwise you may find yourself subject to average.
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“subject” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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