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Definition of “substitute” - English Dictionary

"substitute" in American English

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substituteverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈsʌb·stɪˌtut/
to use someone or something ​instead of another ​person or thing: [T] You can substitute ​oil for ​butter in this ​recipe. [I] He was called on to substitute for the ​ailingstar last ​night.
substitute
noun [C]  us   /ˈsʌb·stɪˌtut/
Talk is a ​poor substitute for ​action.
(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"substitute" in British English

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substituteverb

uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tʃuːt/  us   /ˈsʌb.stə.tuːt/
B2 [T] to use something or someone ​instead of another thing or ​person: You can substitute ​oil forbutter in this ​recipe. Dayton was substituted for Williams in the second ​half of the ​game.
substitute for sth
to ​perform the same ​job as another thing or to take ​itsplace: Gas-fired ​powerstations will substitute for less ​efficientcoal-firedequipment.

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substitutenoun [C]

uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tʃuːt/  us   /ˈsʌb.stə.tuːt/
B2 a thing or ​person that is used ​instead of another thing or ​person: Tofu can be used as a ​meat substitute in ​vegetarianrecipes. Vitamins should not be used as a substitute for a ​healthydiet.
(informal sub) in ​sports, a ​player who is used for ​part of a ​gameinstead of another ​player: Johnson came on as a substitute towards the end of the ​game. The ​manager brought on another substitute in the ​finalminutes of the ​game.
there is no substitute for sth
nothing is as good as the ​stated thing: You can ​read about other ​countries, but there's no substitute for ​visiting them yourself.
US (informal sub) a substitute teacher

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(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"substitute" in Business English

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substituteverb

uk   us   /ˈsʌbstɪtjuːt/
[T] to use something different or new instead of another thing: substitute sth for sth Industry must ​reducefuelconsumption by substituting alternative ​fuels for fossil ​fuels.substitute sth with sth It ​takestime to substitute ​localbrands with your own ​brandnames.
substitute for sb [I]
WORKPLACE to take the ​place of another ​person or do their ​job for a ​period of ​time: She was ​asked to substitute for the ​absentcommitteechairman.
substitute for sth [I]
to do the same ​job as another thing or take its ​place: The ​government expects ​naturalgas to substitute for ​oilexports in the future. Many dot.com ​companies have learnt that ​technology can never substitute for ​customerservice.

substitutenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈsʌbstɪtjuːt/
something different or new that is used instead of another thing: (as) a substitute for sth We are looking at the possibility of using ​foreignproduction as a substitute for ​exports to ​foreignmarkets.cheap/good/poor substitutes Cheaper substitutes displaced the ​product from the ​worldmarket. egg/fat/meat substitutes Early ​warning of a ​layoff is no substitute for a ​job.
WORKPLACE someone who ​takes the ​place of another ​person or does their ​job for a ​period of ​time: a substitute for sb Fixed-term ​contractworkers and ​agencyworkers are not always ​direct substitutes for one another.
there's no substitute for sth/doing sth
nothing else is as good as the ​stated thing or ​action: In this ​industry, there's no substitute for ​experience.
(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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