supplement Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “supplement” - English Dictionary

"supplement" in American English

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supplementnoun [C]

 us   /ˈsʌp·lə·mənt/
something that is ​added to something ​else in ​order to ​improve it or ​complete it; something ​extra: hormone/​vitamin supplements A supplement is also an ​extrapart of a ​magazine or ​newspaper: an ​advertising supplement

supplementverb [T]

 us   /ˈsʌp·ləˌment/
to ​add to something: She got a second ​job to supplement her ​income.
(Definition of supplement from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"supplement" in British English

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supplementnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈsʌp.lɪ.mənt/
C2 something that is ​added to something ​else in ​order to ​improve it or ​complete it; something ​extra: The ​doctor said she should be taking ​vitamin supplements. The ​money I get from ​teaching eveningnight ​classesprovides a supplement to my ​mainincome. We ​paid a supplement (= an ​extraamount of ​money) so that we could have a ​cabin on ​board the ​ship. a ​part of a ​magazine or ​newspaper, either ​producedseparately or as ​part of the ​magazine or ​newspaper: The ​newspaperpublishes a ​sports supplement every ​Monday. an ​extrapart of a ​book, either ​producedseparately or ​included at the end of the ​book, ​containinginformation that was not ​available when the ​book was first ​published: There is a supplement to the ​dictionarycontaining new words.

supplementverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈsʌp.lɪ.ment/
(Definition of supplement from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"supplement" in Business English

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supplementnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈsʌplɪmənt/
COMMUNICATIONS a ​part of a ​newspaper, ​report, etc. that is ​published in ​addition to the ​mainpart: In this supplement we ​look at how ​companies can ​measure their ​carbonfootprint. a Sunday/monthly/​quarterly supplement
a ​medicine that contains substances that you need to ​stayhealthy in ​addition to what you get in your ​food: dietary/nutritional/​food supplements
MARKETING an ​additionalamount that you ​pay for a particular ​service, a better ​place to ​stay, etc.: a supplement of sth We ​paid a supplement of €40 for a ​room with a balcony.
HR, WORKPLACE an ​amount that you ​earn in ​addition to your basic ​salary: The ​income from the ​investmentssupports universities by ​paying for scholarships and ​salary supplements.
something that is done as an ​addition to an ​activity or ​process in ​order to ​improve it: a supplement to sth The ​measures were ​introduced as a supplement to the state's ​disasterplan.

supplementverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈsʌplɪment/
to ​add more ​people or things to an ​activity or ​process in ​order to ​improve it: During especially ​busyperiods, around 175 ​temporaryworkers supplement a ​productionworkforce of 3,500. Legal ​controls have been supplemented by ​financialcontrols, especially over ​capitalexpenditure.
HR, WORKPLACE to ​earn or receive ​extramoney in ​addition to your basic ​salary or ​pension: Base ​pay of all ​executives is £125,000, supplemented by ​bonuseslinked to ​individualoutput.supplement your income/earnings/pension They decided to use the ​equity in their ​home to supplement their ​income.
(Definition of supplement from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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