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Definition of “swing” - English Dictionary

"swing" in American English

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swingverb

us   /swɪŋ/ past tense and past participle swung /swʌŋ/
  • swing verb (MOVE SIDEWAYS)

[I/T] to move easily to one direction and then to the other from a fixed point, or to cause something to move this way: [I] He hung upside down and swung back and forth. [I] The heavy door swung open. [T] Campanella knew how to swing a bat. [T] He swung the car into the garage.
  • swing verb (CHANGE)

[I] to change from one condition or attitude to another: The company swung from record profits last year to huge losses this year.
  • swing verb (BE EXCITING)

[I] dated slang to be exciting, enjoyable, and active
  • swing verb (ARRANGE)

[T] infml to arrange to obtain or achieve something: The kids need new clothes, and I don’t see how I can swing it.

swingnoun

us   /swɪŋ/
  • swing noun (MUSIC)

[U] a form of jazz music that was popular esp. in the 1930s and 1940s
  • swing noun (CHANGE)

[C] a usually sudden change: He’s very creative but prone to mood swings.
  • swing noun (SIDEWAYS MOVEMENT)

[C] a swinging movement: Scott took a big swing at the ball and missed.
[C] A swing is also an attempt to hit someone: This guy took a swing at me.
[C] A swing is also a seat that moves backward and forward and hangs from ropes or chains.
[C] A swing can also be a brief trip: Ed took a 10-day swing through France.
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"swing" in British English

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swingverb

uk   /swɪŋ/ us   /swɪŋ/ swung, swung
  • swing verb (MOVE SIDEWAYS)

B2 [I or T] to move easily and without interruption backwards and forwards or from one side to the other, especially from a fixed point, or to cause something or someone to do this: He walked briskly along swinging his rolled-up umbrella. The door swung open.
[I or T] to move an object or your fist in an attempt to hit something or someone: I swung (the bat) and missed. He swung his fist towards Ben's face.
[I] to change: His mood swings between elation and despair.

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  • swing verb (MUSIC)

[I or T] to play music in a strong, exciting style like jazz, or (of music) to be played in this way

swingnoun

uk   /swɪŋ/ us   /swɪŋ/
  • swing noun (SIDEWAYS MOVEMENT)

[C] a swinging movement
[C] an attempt to hit someone: The drunk took a wild swing at Harry.
[C] a change: He experiences severe mood swings (= sudden changes from one extreme mood to another). The party only needs a five percent swing (= needs five percent of voters to change to supporting it) to win this election.

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  • swing noun (MUSIC)

[U] a type of dance music that was popular in the 1930s and 40s
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"swing" in Business English

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swingverb

uk   /swɪŋ/ us   swung, swung
[I or T] to change, or make a situation, price, opinion, etc. change in a noticeable way: swing into profit/deficit The internet company swung into profit for the first time since its start-up. swing from sth to sth The group swung from losses of 0.8p to earnings of 2.9p a share. The war was the biggest issue threatening to swing voters.
[T] to achieve the result you want, especially by successfully persuading someone of something: The bidder was presented with a list of added benefits that would help swing the deal in their favour.

swingnoun [C]

uk   /swɪŋ/ us  
a big and sudden change in a situation, price, opinion, etc.: Coffee futures once again staged a huge price swing with uncertainty over export controls.a swing into the red/black He also announced a swing into the black in the year to February.a swing towards/against sb/sth Evidence of the swing towards short-term temporary employment comes in a survey showing record demand for temporary staff.
in full swing
happening at the highest level of activity: The report confirms that the economic recovery is in full swing.
See also
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“swing” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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