take sth up Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “take sth up” - English Dictionary

"take sth up" in British English

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take sth up

phrasal verb with take uk   us   /teɪk/ verb (took, taken)
  • (FILL)

B2 to ​fill an ​amount of ​space or ​time: This ​desktakes up too much ​room. Too much of this ​report is taken up without-of-datenumbers.

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  • (START)

B1 to ​start doing a ​particularjob or ​activity: He's taken up the ​position of ​supervisor. [+ -ing verb] Have you ​everthought of taking up ​acting? Patti took up (= ​continued) the ​story where Sue had ​left off.take up office UK (US take office) to ​start an ​officialjob: The ​minister took up ​office in ​December.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • (DISCUSS)

to ​discuss something or ​deal with something: The ​school took the ​matter up with the ​police.UK I'd like to take you up onyoursalesfigures for ​June.UK A ​leadinglawfirm took up his ​case.
  • (CLOTHING)

to make a ​piece of ​clothing, such as a ​skirt or ​trousers, ​shorter
(Definition of take sth up from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"take sth up" in Business English

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take sth up

phrasal verb with take uk   us   /teɪk/ verb [T] (took, taken)
to ​fill an ​amount of ​space or ​time: Getting his ​businessstarted has taken up all his ​time.
to ​start doing a new ​job or ​activity: She ​takes up her new ​post on December 1.
to ​accept something: To take up this ​offer, you must ​apply in writing by end March 2012.take sb up on sth I'm happy to take him up on his ​challenge.
to discuss or ​deal with something in a ​formal way: take sth up with sb If you have a problem, you should take it up with the ​manager. I took the matter up with the ​bank.
(Definition of take sth up from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“take sth up” in English

“take sth up” in Business English

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