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Definition of “taste” - English Dictionary

"taste" in American English

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tastenoun [C/U]

 us   /teɪst/
  • taste noun [C/U] (FLAVOR)

a ​flavor and ​feelingproduced by ​food or ​drink in ​yourmouth that ​tells you what it is and ​lets you ​appreciate it, or the ​ability to have this ​feeling: [U] Sugar has a ​sweet taste and ​lemons have a ​sour taste. [U] I’ve ​lost my taste for (= ​stoppedenjoying the taste of)spicyfoods.
A taste is also a ​smallamount: [C usually sing] Have a taste of this ​sauce and ​tell me if it’s too ​salty. [C usually sing] fig. I had a taste of (= I ​brieflyexperienced)factorywork last ​summer, and I didn’t like it at all.
  • taste noun [C/U] (JUDGMENT)

a person’s ​ability to ​judge and ​appreciate what is good and ​suitable, esp. in ​art, ​beauty, ​style, and ​behavior: [U] Barbara has good/​poor taste in ​clothes.
Taste is also a person’s ​liking for or ​appreciation of something: [C] My ​son and I have very different tastes in ​music.

tasteverb

 us   /teɪst/
  • taste verb (HAVE FLAVOR)

to have a ​particularflavor: [L] Coffee always tastes good in the ​morning. [I always + adv/prep] This tastes as if/as though/like it has ​pepper in it. [T] I ​hope you can taste the ​garlic. [T] Taste (= ​try a little of) this and ​tell me if you like it.
(Definition of taste from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"taste" in British English

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tastenoun

uk   /teɪst/  us   /teɪst/
  • taste noun (FLAVOUR)

B1 [C or U] the ​flavour of something, or the ​ability of a ​person or ​animal to ​recognize different ​flavours: I ​love the taste ofgarlic. Olives are usually an acquired taste (= you only like them after you have ​becomefamiliar with ​their taste). When you have a ​cold you often ​loseyour sense of taste.
See also
a taste for sth
C2 the ​fact of ​liking or ​enjoying something: She came ​home from ​Europe with a taste for ​art and the ​finer things in ​life.
[S] a ​smallamount of ​food: Have a taste of the ​sauce and ​tell me if it ​needssalt.

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  • taste noun (JUDGMENT)

B2 [C or U] a person's ​approval of and ​liking for ​particular things: I'm not really into new ​cars - ​oldvintagecars are more to my taste (= what I like).
B2 [U] approving a person's ​ability to ​judge and ​recognize what is good or ​suitable, ​especiallyrelating to such ​matters as ​art, ​style, ​beauty, and ​behaviour: He hasterrible taste so you can ​probablyimagine what his ​houselooks like. His taste inclothesleaves a little to be ​desired.
tastes B2 [plural]
the things a ​personlikes: I haveexpensive tastes (= I like ​expensive things).

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tasteverb [T]

uk   /teɪst/  us   /teɪst/
  • taste verb [T] (FOOD/DRINK)

B1 to put ​food or ​drink in ​yourmouth to ​find out what ​flavour it has: Taste this ​sauce and ​tell me if it ​needsseasoning. What is this? I've never tasted anything like it.
taste good, bad, sweet, etc.
B1 to have a ​particularflavour: This ​sauce tastes ​strange. This ​coffee tastes likedishwater!UK The ​bread tastes ofonions.

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  • Taste the ​stew to ​see if it has enough ​salt.
  • How do you ​know you don't like it if you won't ​even taste it?
  • We all tasted the ​cake.
  • If you've ​ever tasted Carmen's ​cooking, you'll ​know what I ​mean.
  • She ​drew off a little of her home-made ​wine just to taste.
(Definition of taste from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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