taste Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “taste” - English Dictionary

Definition of "taste" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

tastenoun [C/U]

 us   /teɪst/

taste noun [C/U] (FLAVOR)

a ​flavor and ​feelingproduced by ​food or ​drink in ​yourmouth that ​tells you what it is and ​lets you ​appreciate it, or the ​ability to have this ​feeling: [U] Sugar has a ​sweet taste and ​lemons have a ​sour taste. [U] I’ve ​lost my taste for (= ​stoppedenjoying the taste of)spicyfoods. A taste is also a ​smallamount: [C usually sing] Have a taste of this ​sauce and ​tell me if it’s too ​salty. [C usually sing] fig. I had a taste of (= I ​brieflyexperienced)factorywork last ​summer, and I didn’t like it at all.

taste noun [C/U] (JUDGMENT)

a person’s ​ability to ​judge and ​appreciate what is good and ​suitable, esp. in ​art, ​beauty, ​style, and ​behavior: [U] Barbara has good/​poor taste in ​clothes. Taste is also a person’s ​liking for or ​appreciation of something: [C] My ​son and I have very different tastes in ​music.

tasteverb

 us   /teɪst/

taste verb (HAVE FLAVOR)

to have a ​particularflavor: [L] Coffee always tastes good in the ​morning. [I always + adv/prep] This tastes as if/as though/like it has ​pepper in it. [T] I ​hope you can taste the ​garlic. [T] Taste (= ​try a little of) this and ​tell me if you like it.
(Definition of taste from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "taste" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

tastenoun

uk   us   /teɪst/

taste noun (FLAVOUR)

B1 [C or U] the ​flavour of something, or the ​ability of a ​person or ​animal to ​recognize different ​flavours: I ​love the taste ofgarlic. Olives are usually an acquired taste (= you only like them after you have ​becomefamiliar with ​their taste). When you have a ​cold you often ​loseyour sense of taste.
See also
a taste for sth C2 the ​fact of ​liking or ​enjoying something: She came ​home from ​Europe with a taste for ​art and the ​finer things in ​life. [S] a ​smallamount of ​food: Have a taste of the ​sauce and ​tell me if it ​needssalt.
More examples

taste noun (JUDGMENT)

B2 [C or U] a person's ​approval of and ​liking for ​particular things: I'm not really into new ​cars - ​oldvintagecars are more to my taste (= what I like).B2 [U] approving a person's ​ability to ​judge and ​recognize what is good or ​suitable, ​especiallyrelating to such ​matters as ​art, ​style, ​beauty, and ​behaviour: He hasterrible taste so you can ​probablyimagine what his ​houselooks like. His taste inclothesleaves a little to be ​desired.tastes B2 [plural] the things a ​personlikes: I haveexpensive tastes (= I like ​expensive things).
More examples

taste noun (EXPERIENCE)

B2 [S] a ​shortexperience of something: I had a taste ofofficework during the ​summer and that was enough.

tasteverb [T]

uk   us   /teɪst/

taste verb [T] (FOOD/DRINK)

B1 to put ​food or ​drink in ​yourmouth to ​find out what ​flavour it has: Taste this ​sauce and ​tell me if it ​needsseasoning. What is this? I've never tasted anything like it.taste good, bad, sweet, etc. B1 to have a ​particularflavour: This ​sauce tastes ​strange. This ​coffee tastes likedishwater!UK The ​bread tastes ofonions.
More examples
  • Taste the ​stew to ​see if it has enough ​salt.
  • How do you ​know you don't like it if you won't ​even taste it?
  • We all tasted the ​cake.
  • If you've ​ever tasted Carmen's ​cooking, you'll ​know what I ​mean.
  • She ​drew off a little of her home-made ​wine just to taste.

taste verb [T] (EXPERIENCE)

to ​experience something for a ​shorttime: Once you've tasted ​luxury it's very hard to ​settle for anything ​else.
(Definition of taste from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of taste?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

harvest

to pick and collect crops, or to collect plants, animals, or fish to eat

Word of the Day

In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
by Liz Walter,
September 02, 2015
Several readers have asked for information on prepositions, so I will start with a blog post that looks at an area where they are really important: travel. The first thing to remember is that we use to (and not ‘in’) after the verb go: We are going to London. I went to

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More