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Definition of “tear” - English Dictionary

"tear" in American English

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tearnoun [C usually pl]

 us   /tɪər/
a drop of salty liquid that flows from the eye when it is hurt or as a result of strong emotion, esp. unhappiness or pain: By the end of the movie I had tears in my eyes (= I was ready to cry). The boy had lost his money and was in tears (= crying).

tearverb

 us   /teər/ (past tense tore  /tɔr, toʊr/ , past participle torn  /tɔrn, toʊrn/ )
  • tear verb (PULL APART)

[I/T] to pull or be pulled apart or away from something else, or to cause this to happen to something: [T] I caught my shirt on a nail and tore the sleeve. [T] I tore a hole in my sleeve. [T] Several pages had been torn out of the book. [M] She tore off a strip of bandage and wrapped it around the wound. [M] He angrily tore the letter up (= into small pieces). [M] They tore down (= destroyed) the old building. [M] fig. The political situation threatened to tear the country apart.
  • tear verb (HURRY)

[I always + adv/prep] infml to move very quickly; to rush: She was late and went tearing around the house looking for her car keys.

tearnoun [C]

 us   /ter, tær/
  • tear noun [C] (OPENING)

a hole or opening in something that is made by pulling apart or away from something else: There’s a tear in the lining of my coat.
(Definition of tear from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"tear" in British English

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tearverb

uk   /teər/  us   /ter/ (tore, torn)

tearnoun [C]

uk   /teər/  us   /ter/

tearnoun

uk   /tɪər/  us   /tɪr/

tearverb [I]

uk   /tɪər/  us   /tɪr/
(Definition of tear from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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