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Definition of “thin” - English Dictionary

"thin" in American English

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thinadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /θɪn/ (-nn-)
having a ​smalldistance from the ​top to the ​bottomside: thin ​summerclothing The ​statue is coated with a thin ​layer of ​gold.
having little ​extraflesh on the ​body: thin ​arms/​legs a thin ​face Models must be ​tall and thin.
having only a few of something ​covering an ​area; not ​dense: His ​hair is thin on ​top. Where there is little ​rain, ​grass and ​trees get thinner.
(of a ​liquid) ​flowingeasily: We ​begandinner with a thin but ​tastysoup.
lackingforce or ​substance; ​weak: a thin, ​metallictone I ​thought the ​plot was a ​bit thin. We ​slept poorly that ​night in the thin ​mountainair.

thinverb [I/T]

 us   /θɪn/ (-nn-)
  • thin verb [I/T] (BECOME FEWER)

to ​become fewer in ​number, or to make a ​group of things fewer in ​number: [I] Traffic thins out after seven o’clock. [T] An ​improvingeconomyhelped thin ​unemploymentlines.
(Definition of thin from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"thin" in British English

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thinadjective

uk   /θɪn/  us   /θɪn/ (thinner, thinnest)
  • thin adjective (NOT THICK)

A2 having a ​smalldistance between two ​oppositesides: a thin ​book thin ​blacklines a thin ​jacket (= made from thin ​material)

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • thin adjective (NOT FAT)

A2 (of the ​body) with little ​flesh on the ​bones: Did you ​notice how thin her ​wrists were? Thin, ​hungrydogsroamed the ​streets.
Opposite
be as thin as a rake UK (mainly US be as thin as a rail)
to be very thin: He ​eats like a ​horse and ​yet he's as thin as a ​rake.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

thinness
noun [U] uk   /ˈθɪn.nəs/  us   /ˈθɪn.nəs/
the thinness of his ​hair The ​authordiscusses why ​femalebeauty has ​becomelinked to thinness.

thinverb

uk   /θɪn/  us   /θɪn/ (-nn-)
(Definition of thin from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"thin" in Business English

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thinadjective

uk   us   /θɪn/ (thinner, thinnest)
FINANCE, COMMERCE if ​trading, etc. is thin, not many ​people are ​buying or ​sellingshares, etc.: Investor ​perceptions may ​decrease the ​value of ​high-riskbonds, especially in a thin ​market. In another day of thin ​trading, the FTSE 100 ​rose 21 to 5269.5.
having only a ​smallnumber of ​people or a ​smallamount of something, especially ​money: Wages are ​lower in the ​area, and ​unionmembership is thin. Turnover was extremely thin. a thin ​budget
a thin margin/profit margin
COMMERCE a ​situation in which there is only a ​small difference between the ​totalcost of making and ​selling something and the ​price it is ​sold for, or between the ​totalamount of ​money a ​company receives from ​sales and the ​totalcost of ​producing all its ​products and ​services: Cost is an ​issue in a ​business that operates on thin ​margins.
be stretched thin
to not have enough ​money, ​people, ​supplies, etc. to ​operate, do a ​job, or ​provide what is needed: Without more ​money, the ​programs would be ​stretched thin. In the ​currenteconomicclimate, ​doctors and nurses are ​stretched thin and ​equipment is ​lacking in many of the clinics.
the thin end of the wedge UK
something that is not very harmful in itself but that will be the ​start of a harmful ​development: The ​introduction of a ​fee for the ​service has been described as "the thin end of the wedge" by ​unionleaders.
thin on the ground UK
existing only in ​smallnumbers or ​amounts: Good ​strategicleaders are very thin on the ​ground in UK ​companies.
(Definition of thin from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“thin” in Business English

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