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Definition of “through” - English Dictionary

"through" in American English

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throughadjective, adverb [not gradable]

us   /θru/
from one side or end to the other, from one part to another, or from the beginning to the end: We drove through the tunnel We took a shortcut through the woods. Have you read the report all the way through?
If you drive through a red light or stop sign, you do not stop at it.
finished or completed: Are you through with that book? My girlfriend says we’re through (= our relationship is over).
during a period of time, esp. from the beginning to the end: We sat through two lectures and then left. She had just enough energy to get through the day. I work Tuesdays through Saturdays (= each day during this period).

throughpreposition

us   /θru/
  • through preposition (AS A RESULT)

as a result of: Bob learned of the contract through a story in the newspaper.
  • through preposition (USING)

by; using: Schools are financed through property taxes.
(Definition of through from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"through" in British English

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throughpreposition, adverb

uk   /θruː/ us   /θruː/
  • through preposition, adverb (PLACE)

A2 also US not standard thru from one end or side of something to the other: They walked slowly through the woods. The boy waded through the water to reach his boat. He struggled through the crowd till he reached the front. How long the journey takes will depend on how long it takes to get through the traffic. Her words kept running through my mind/head (= I kept hearing her words in my imagination). We drove through the tunnel. I saw him drive through a red light (= he did not stop at the red traffic light). I'll put you through (= connect you by phone) (to the sales department).

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • through preposition, adverb (TIME)

B1 from the beginning to the end of a period of time: It rained all/right through June and into the first half of July. We sat through two of the speeches and then left. She had just enough energy to get through the day.US She works Monday through Thursday (= from Monday to Thursday).

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

throughpreposition

uk   /θruː/ us   /θruː/

throughadjective

uk   /θruː/ us   /θruː/
(Definition of through from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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