throw Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “throw” - English Dictionary

Definition of "throw" - American English Dictionary

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throwverb

 us   /θroʊ/ (past tense threw  /θru/ , past participle thrown  /θroʊn/ )

throw verb (SEND THROUGH AIR)

[I/T] to ​send something through the ​air, esp. by a ​suddenmovement of the ​arm: [T] Throw me the ​ball./Throw the ​ball to me. [I] I didn’t throw as well as I ​expected to. [T] He was thrown from his ​motorcycle.

throw verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[T] to move something ​quickly or with a ​lack of ​attention, or to ​cause someone or something to move ​quickly: He threw the ​switch and the ​lights came on. Suddenly, she ​grabbed the ​snake and threw it to the ​ground. [M] They threw up ​theirhands to ​protect themselves from the ​hail. [M] He threw his ​head back and ​laughed. [M] Throw a few ​peppers in the ​pot.

throw verb (CONFUSE)

[T] infml to ​confuse someone: That ​question really threw me at first.

thrownoun [C]

 us   /θroʊ/

throw noun [C] (THROWING SOMETHING)

the ​act of throwing something, esp. a ​ball: She ​timed her throw so the ​ballreached the ​base when he did.
(Definition of throw from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "throw" - British English Dictionary

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throwverb

uk   /θrəʊ/  us   /θroʊ/ (threw, thrown)

throw verb (SEND THROUGH AIR)

A2 [I or T] to ​send something through the ​air with ​force, ​especially by a ​suddenmovement of the ​arm: My ​friend threw the ball back over the ​fence. The ​coat was thrown over the back of the ​chair. She threw herself into a ​chair, ​exhausted. The ​rider was thrown as the ​horsejumped the ​fence. He threw a ​punch at (= ​hit) his ​attacker.throw a glance/look to ​lookquickly or ​suddenly: The ​boy threw a ​frightenedlook in the ​direction of the ​house.
More examples

throw verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

C2 [T] to ​cause to ​move or ​actquickly or ​carelessly: She threw back her ​hair.

throw verb (CONFUSE)

[T] to ​confuse or ​shock someone or ​causedifficulty for them: I wasn't ​expecting a ​visitor. I was really thrown. The ​news of the ​coup threw them into a ​state of ​panic.

throw verb (OPEN)

throw sth open to ​open something that was ​closed, usually ​suddenly and ​completely: She ​drew back the ​curtains and threw ​open all the ​windows. to ​allowpeople to ​enter or ​becomeinvolved in an ​event: The ​competition has been thrown ​open to the ​public.

throw verb (PARTY)

throw a party to have a ​party: Flavio threw a ​party for Colin's 50th ​birthday.

throw verb (ANGER)

throw a fit/tantrum to ​experience and show a ​strongfeeling of ​anger, ​especiallysuddenly: My ​mother threw a ​fit when she ​saw what a ​mess we'd made of her ​kitchen.

throw verb (SHAPE)

[T] specialized art to ​shapeclay on a ​special round ​table that ​spins

thrownoun

uk   /θrəʊ/  us   /θroʊ/

throw noun (THROWING)

[C] an ​act of throwing something: a throw of the ​dice

throw noun (EACH)

a throw [S] UK informal used to ​mean each thing or for each ​time: We could get a ​coffee in there but they ​charge three ​quid a throw.

throw noun (COVER)

[C] a ​largepiece of ​cloth that you use to ​cover a ​chair, sofa, etc. to make it ​lookattractive: A throw can ​protect a new ​sofa or ​enhance the ​appearance of an ​old, ​tired one.
(Definition of throw from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "throw" - Business English Dictionary

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throwverb [T]

uk   us   /θrəʊ/ (threw, thrown)
throw the book at sb informal to punish someone as severely as possible for ​breaking the ​law: The US ​taxauthorities threw the ​book at the ​Europeanaccountancygroup over its tax-saving ​schemes.
throw good money after bad disapproving to ​wastemoney by continuing to ​invest in something that has already ​cost a lot and is unlikely to be a ​success: The ​government may be throwing good ​money after ​bad by using ​taxpayers' ​money to ​bail out the ​failingbanks.
throw your hat into the ring to announce that you want to ​compete for something, be considered for a ​job, etc.: He is the sixth ​candidate to throw his hat into the ​ring for the ​topjob in the ​organization.
throw your money around informal disapproving to ​spend a lot of ​money, especially in a way that ​showspeople you are not worried about ​money: Despite the biggest ​recession in over a decade, city ​professionals still seem to have plenty of ​money to throw around.
throw money at sth disapproving to ​try to solve a problem or make something ​successful by ​spending a lot of ​money, rather than, for ​example, having new ​ideas: The ​government will have to throw ​money at any problems to ensure the ​site is ​built on ​time.
throw money down the drain UK ( US throw money down a rat hole) to ​wastemoney by ​spending it on something that will never be a ​success or make any ​profit: Investors threw ​money down the ​drain by making ​regularcontributions to the ​failedpensionplan.
throw your weight around disapproving to ​act in a way that emphasizes how much ​power or ​authority you have: The ​board didn't like the way ​majorityshareholders were throwing their ​weight around.
throw your weight behind sth to use your ​power to ​support a ​project, an ​idea, etc.: Senior politicians threw their ​weight behind the charity's ​campaign.
See also
(Definition of throw from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“throw” in Business English

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