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Definition of “token” - English Dictionary

"token" in American English

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tokennoun [C]

us   /ˈtoʊ·kən/
  • token noun [C] (SYMBOL)

something you give to someone or do for someone to express your feelings or intentions: It isn’t a big present – it’s just a token of thanks for your help.
  • token noun [C] (DISK)

a round, metal or plastic disk which is used instead of money in some machines: subway tokens

tokenadjective [not gradable]

us   /ˈtoʊ·kən/
small or limited but having a symbolic importance: a token fee a token gesture of goodwill
(Definition of token from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"token" in British English

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tokennoun [C]

uk   /ˈtəʊ.kən/ us   /ˈtoʊ.kən/
  • token noun [C] (SYMBOL)

C1 something that you do, or a thing that you give someone, that expresses your feelings or intentions, although it might have little practical effect: As a token of our gratitude for all that you have done, we would like you to accept this small gift. It doesn't have to be a big present - it's just a token.

tokenadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈtəʊ.kən/ us   /ˈtoʊ.kən/
Token actions are done to show that you are doing something, even if the results are limited in their effect: The troops in front of us either surrendered or offered only token (= not much) resistance. They were the only country to argue for even token recognition of the Baltic states' independence.
disapproving used to refer to something that is done to prevent other people complaining, although it is not sincerely meant and has no real effect: The truth is that they appoint no more than a token number of women to managerial jobs.
(Definition of token from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"token" in Business English

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tokennoun [C]

uk   /ˈtəʊkən/ us  
MONEY a round piece of metal or plastic that is used instead of money in some machines, for example, to get food or drink out of a vending machine, use a car park, etc: You'll need some tokens for the coffee machine.
MARKETING a piece of paper that is given when you buy a particular product, which can be exchanged for something when you have collected enough of them: There is a promotion on the cereal box offering a free toy for every 10 tokens you collect.
formal an action that you take or a thing that you give that is a symbol of your feelings about something, even though it may not be very big or valuable: a token of sth Please accept this gift as a token of our gratitude.

tokenadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈtəʊkən/ us  
disapproving done or existing only to show that you are following rules or doing what is expected, even though the results are limited: The wording of the advertisement was merely a token gesture towards equal opportunities. She was appointed as the token woman on the board
used to describe a payment that is very small: a token sum/payment There is a token charge for membership of the staff club.
(Definition of token from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“token” in Business English

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