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Definition of “touch” - English Dictionary

"touch" in American English

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touchverb

 us   /tʌtʃ/
  • touch verb (USE FINGERS)

[I/T] to put the ​fingers or ​handlightly on or against something: [I] That ​paint is ​wet, so don’t touch.
[I/T] infml If you cannot touch something, you are not ​allowed to have or use it: [T] She can’t touch the ​money from her ​father until she’s 21.
[I/T] infml If you say you do not touch something, you ​mean that you do not ​drink or ​eat it: [T] I never touch ​candy.
  • touch verb (BE CLOSE)

[I/T] to be so ​close together that there is no ​space between: [T] Don’t ​let the back of the ​chair touch the ​wall. [I] Push the ​bookcases together until they touch.
[I/T] If one thing does not touch something ​similar, it is not as good as the other thing: [T] Her ​cooking can’t touch her sister’s.
  • touch verb (CAUSE FEELINGS)

[T] to ​cause someone to ​feelsympathetic or ​grateful: Yourkindness has touched my ​family.

touchnoun

 us   /tʌtʃ/
  • touch noun (SKILL)

[U] a ​skill or ​specialquality: He ​seems to be ​losing his touch at ​poker. The ​flowers were a ​nice touch.
  • touch noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

[C] a ​smallamount: There was a touch of ​regret in her ​voice. I had a touch of ​fluyesterday.
  • touch noun (BEING CLOSE)

[U] the ​state of being ​close together or in ​contact with someone or something
  • touch noun (FEELING WITH FINGERS )

[C/U] the ​ability to ​know what something is like by putting ​yourhand or ​fingers on it: [U] This ​cloth is ​soft to the touch.
[C/U] A touch is an ​act of putting ​yourhand or ​fingersbriefly on something to ​operate it: [C] At a touch of the ​button, the ​dooropened.
(Definition of touch from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"touch" in British English

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touchverb

uk   /tʌtʃ/  us   /tʌtʃ/
  • touch verb (PUT HAND ON)

B1 [I or T] to put ​yourhand or another ​part of ​yourbodylightly onto and off something or someone: That ​paint is ​wet - don't touch (it). He touched the ​girl on the ​arm to get her ​attention. The ​boy touched the ​worm with (= using, in his ​hand) a ​twig.figurative The setting ​sun touched the ​trees withred (= made them ​appearred for a ​shorttime).

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  • touch verb (BE CLOSE TOGETHER)

B2 [I or T] (of two or more things) to be so ​close together that there is no ​space between; to be in contact: He ​fellasleep as ​soon as his ​head touched the ​pillow. She ​pushed the two ​bookcases together until they touched/were touching.
  • touch verb (BE AS GOOD)

[T] (usually used in ​negativesentences) to have or ​reach the same standard (= ​level of ​quality) as someone or something: Her ​novels can't touch (= are not as good as) those of her ​sister. There's no one to touch him as an ​illustrator of children's ​books.

touchnoun

uk   /tʌtʃ/  us   /tʌtʃ/
  • touch noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

C2 [S] a ​smallamount: "Would you like ​milk?" "Just a touch." There was a touch ofirony/​humour in her ​voice.
[S] informal To show that an ​illness is not too ​serious, you can say you have had a touch of it: I had a touch of ​flu/​hayfever.
C2 [C] a ​smalladdition or ​detail that makes something ​better: The ​speech had several ​comic touches. Using a ​sailingship as the ​companylogo was a touch of ​genius (= a good/​cleveridea or ​action). The ​flowers on the ​tableprovided the finishing touch.
a touch
slightly: The ​weather has ​turned a touch too ​cold for my ​liking.

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  • touch noun (FEELING)

B2 [U] the ​ability to ​know what something is like by ​feeling it with the ​fingers: the ​sense of touch I ​found the ​rightcoin in the ​dark by touch.
to the touch B2 (also to your touch)
used after an ​adjective to ​express how something ​feels when you put ​yourhand on it: The ​material was ​soft to the touch.

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  • touch noun (MOVEMENT ONTO/OFF)

B2 [C usually singular] a ​quick, ​lightmovement of one thing, ​especially a ​hand, onto and off another thing: I ​felt a ​cold touch on my ​arm. At a/the touch of a ​button, the ​dooropened.
  • touch noun (COMMUNICATION)

be, get, keep, etc. in touch

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B1 to ​communicate or ​continue to ​communicate with someone by using a ​phone or writing to them: Are you still in touch with any of ​youroldschoolfriends? Jen and I never ​kept in touch after ​college. We're in close touch with ​ouroffice in Spain.
lose touch
B2 to ​stopcommunicating with someone, usually because they do not ​live near you now: We ​lost touch over the ​years.
  • touch noun (ABILITY)

[S or U] an ​ability to do things in the ​stated, ​especiallypositive, way: He has a ​deft touch with ​trickypaintingjobs. She gave the ​job her own ​special/​magic/​professional/​personal touch. I ​admire her ​lightness/​sureness of touch as a ​cook. He used to be a good ​writer but I ​think he's losing his touch.
  • touch noun (BALL CONTROL)

[C or U] in ​sports such as ​football, a player's ​ability to ​control the ​ball and make it do what they ​want, or an ​occasion when a ​playercontrols the ​ball with ​theirfoot: Nicolas Anelka ​squandered the ​chance to ​score when his touch ​let him down in ​front of ​goal. Hazard took several touches before ​crossing.
  • touch noun (KNOWLEDGE)

be in/out of touch
C2 If you are in touch/out of touch with a ​subject, ​activity, or ​situation, ​yourknowledge about it is ​recent/not ​recent: He's not really in touch with what ​youngpeople are ​interested in. I didn't ​see any ​news all the ​time I was on ​holiday, so I'm ​completely out of touch.
(Definition of touch from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"touch" in Business English

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touchverb [I or T]

uk   us   /tʌtʃ/
to put your fingers or ​hand lightly on the surface of something: Don't touch the ​machine when it's in use.
nobody/nothing can touch sb/sth
used to say that someone or something is the best of a particular ​kind: As a hard ​worker, no one can touch him. This ​computer is so powerful, no other ​laptop can touch it.
touch base
to ​talk with someone for a ​shorttime: He ​wants to touch ​base on some of the significant ​items that we've been ​dealing with.

touchnoun

uk   us   /tʌtʃ/
[C] a ​smalladdition or detail which makes something better: Adding music to your ​presentation was a nice touch. I am just putting the finishing touches to my monthly ​report.
in touch
communicating or continuing to communicate with someone by ​phone, ​email, etc.: get/keep/stay in touch (with sb) We need to get in touch with our ​suppliersright away. Let's ​keep in touch over the next few days while the ​installation is in ​progress.
aware of what is ​happening: in touch with sth It's very important to ​stay in touch with the ​practices of other ​employers in the city.
(Definition of touch from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“touch” in Business English

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