track Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “track” - English Dictionary

Definition of "track" - American English Dictionary

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tracknoun

 us   /træk/

track noun (PATH)

[C] a ​path that is ​narrower than a ​road, often with an ​unevensurface: We ​walked along a ​muddy track at the ​side of the ​field. [C] A track is also one or a ​pair of ​parallelmetalbars on which ​trainstravel.

track noun (MARKS)

[C usually pl] a ​mark or ​line of ​marksleft on a ​surface, esp. the ​ground, by a ​movinganimal, ​person, or ​vehicle, that ​shows the ​direction of ​travel: deer tracks in the ​snow

track noun (SPORTS)

[C/U] the ​sport of ​competitiverunning, or a ​wide, ​circularpath that is made for this ​sport: [U] Fall ​sportsincludefootball, ​hockey, and track. [C/U] A track is also a ​speciallypreparedsurface for any ​kind of ​racing: [C] a ​dog/​thoroughbred track

track noun (MUSIC)

[C] one of several ​songs or ​pieces of ​music on a ​musicalrecording

trackverb [T]

 us   /træk/

track verb [T] (MAKE MARKS)

to ​follow something that moves or ​changes by ​noticingmarks or ​signs that it has ​left behind: The ​study tracked the ​careers of 1226 ​doctors who ​trained at Harvard Medical School. If you track something ​messy or ​dirty, you ​leavemessy or ​dirtymarks when ​walking because you had something on ​yourshoes or ​feet: The ​kids are always tracking ​mud in the ​kitchen.
(Definition of track from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "track" - British English Dictionary

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tracknoun

uk   us   /træk/

track noun (PATH)

C1 [C or U] the ​pair of ​longmetalbarsfixed on the ​ground at an ​equaldistance from each other, along which ​trainstravel: a ten-mile ​stretch of track Passengers are ​requested not to ​walkacross the tracks.B1 [C] UK a ​path or ​roughroad that is made of ​soilrather than having a ​surfacecovered with ​stone or other ​material: The ​house is at the end of a ​dirt/an ​unmade track.
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track noun (SPORT)

B1 [C] a ​type of ​path or ​road, often in the ​shape of a ​ring, that has been ​speciallydesigned and ​built for ​sportsevents, ​especiallyracing: an all-weather track a ​dog/​horse track The ​runners are now on ​theirfinallap of the track.
See also
B2 [U] US a ​sport in which ​peoplecompete with each other by ​running a ​race on a ​speciallypreparedcircularpath: a track ​event Sam runs track on the high ​schoolteam. [U] US (also track and field, UK athletics) the ​generalname for a ​particulargroup of ​sports in which ​peoplecompete, ​includingrunning, ​jumping, and ​throwing
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track noun (MARKS)

B2 [C usually plural] a ​mark or ​line of ​marksleft on the ​ground or on another ​surface by an ​animal, ​person, or ​vehicle that has ​moved over it, ​showing the ​direction they ​moved in: Police ​foundtyre tracks in the ​mud. The ​huntersfollowed the tracks of the ​deer for ​hours. The ​burglars were ​careful not to leave any tracks behind them.be on the track of sb/sth to be ​examiningmarks or ​pieces of ​information that show where a ​person or ​animal has gone, in ​order to ​catch him, her, or it: The ​police are on the track of the ​killer.
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track noun (DIRECTION)

[C] the ​direction that something has taken or will take through the ​air: People ​living in the track of the ​hurricane have been ​advised to ​leavetheirhomes until it has ​passed.

track noun (DEVELOPMENT)

C2 [C or U] the ​direction in which someone's ​job or ​educationdevelops: She was a ​lawyer, but then she ​changed track ​completely and ​became a ​doctor. [C usually singular] the way in which a ​thought or ​idea has ​developed or might ​develop: I ​found it ​difficult to ​follow the track of his ​argument.get off the track to ​starttalking about something that is not ​part of what you should be ​talking about: I ​think we're getting off the track here - we're ​supposed to be ​discussingouradvertisingcampaign.

track noun (STUDENTS)

US (UK stream) a ​group of ​schoolstudents with ​similarability who are ​approximately the same ​age and are ​taught together: Students who do well in ​their 8th ​gradeclasses will ​qualify for the ​honors track in high ​school. the ​top/​bottom track

track noun (MUSIC)

B2 [C] one of several ​songs or ​pieces of ​music on a CD or other ​musicalrecording: The ​albumincludes four ​previously unreleased tracks.
See also
[C] a ​part of a magneticstrip onto which ​sound can be ​recorded, with several tracks on one ​magneticstrip: When a ​piece of ​music is ​recorded, each ​instrument is ​recordedseparately on a 24 or 48–track ​tape.
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trackverb

uk   us   /træk/

track verb (FOLLOW)

C2 [T] to ​follow a ​person or ​animal by ​looking for ​proof that they have been ​somewhere, or by using ​electronicequipment: It's ​difficult to track an ​animal over ​stonyground. The ​military use ​radarsatellites to track ​targets through ​clouds and at ​night. The ​terrorists were tracked to (= ​found in) Amsterdam. C2 [T] to ​record the ​progress or ​development of something over a ​period: The ​study tracked the ​careers of 1,226 ​doctors who ​trained at the Medical School.
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track verb (MOVE)

[I] If a ​film or ​videocamera tracks in a ​particulardirection, it ​moves along while it is ​filming: The ​movieends with a ​long tracking shot around the ​desertedhouse. [I] specialized media If a ​movingpart of a ​recordingmachine tracks, it gets into the ​correctposition for ​operating: Our ​VCR tracks ​automatically.

track verb (FINANCE)

[T] to ​follow the ​level of an ​interestrate, shareprice, etc.: The ​mortgagedeal will track the Bank of ​Englandbaserateplus 0.75 ​percent. Tony is putting £500 a ​month into a a ​savingsaccount that tracks the FTSE All-Share ​index.

track verb (STUDENTS)

[T] US (UK track) to ​group and ​teach together ​schoolstudents with ​similarabilities who are ​approximately the same ​age: We ​start to track the ​children in the third ​form.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of track from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "track" - Business English Dictionary

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tracknoun [C]

uk   us   /træk/
the direction that something has taken or in which it is ​moving: They are able to ​forecast the track of the storm days in ​advance.
the way in which something develops or might ​develop: on the right/wrong track We believe we are on the ​right track to ​grow the ​business in the coming months.
the ​type of ​education or career someone chooses and the way it develops: She was a ​lawyer, but then she changed track completely and became a ​doctor. Students ​perform better once ​engaged in a career track with ​clearexpectations of what it ​takes to get a ​job. a vocational/​academic track
the way in which a ​thought or ​idea has ​developed or might ​develop: I ​found it difficult to ​follow the track of his argument.
keep track (of sth) to ​keep a ​record of something, or make ​certain that you know or remember what has ​happened: Keep track of the ​hours you ​work. His ​job is to ​keep track of all the ​shipments going out to ​customers.
lose track (of sth) to ​stopkeeping a ​record of something, or ​stop being ​certain that you know or remember what has ​happened: I have ​lost track of the ​number of ​times you have been late this month. So many ​customers came in that I ​lost track after an hour.
on track making ​progress and likely to ​succeed or ​achieve a particular thing: They're on track to make ​recordprofits.

trackverb

uk   us   /træk/
[T] to ​follow the ​movement or ​progress of something or someone: The ​company set up a ​database to ​help track ​sales across the country. Investigators are tracking ​streams of the ​contaminatedfood through several ​states.
[T] to ​record the ​progress or ​development of something over a ​period: We have been tracking the ​trends in ​computersales for over ten ​years. The ​study tracked the ​careers of 1226 ​doctors who ​trained at the University of Michigan Medical School.
[T] BANKING, FINANCE to ​follow the ​level of an ​interestrate: The ​mortgagedeal will track the Bank of England ​baserateplus 0.75 pc.
[T] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​follow the ​level of a particular shareindex: Tony is putting £500 a month into a ​savingsaccount which tracks the FTSE All-Share ​index.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of track from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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