traffic Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “traffic” - English Dictionary

"traffic" in American English

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trafficnoun [U]

 us   /ˈtræf·ɪk/
  • traffic noun [U] (MOVING THINGS)

the ​movement of ​vehicles or ​people along ​roads, or the ​movement of ​aircraft, ​trains, or ​ships along a ​route: heavy/rush-hour traffic Air traffic has ​increased 30% in the last ​decade.
  • traffic noun [U] (TRADE)

illegaltrade: They’re ​trying to ​cut down on the traffic in ​exoticbirds being ​soldillegally.

trafficverb [I]

 us   /ˈtræf·ɪk/ (present participle trafficking, past tense and past participle trafficked)
to ​buy and ​sell something ​illegally: He was ​charged with trafficking in ​stolengoods.
(Definition of traffic from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"traffic" in British English

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trafficnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈtræf.ɪk/
  • traffic noun [U] (VEHICLES)

A2 the ​number of ​vehiclesmoving along ​roads, or the ​amount of ​aircraft, ​trains, or ​shipsmoving along a ​route: There was heavy/a lot of traffic on the ​roads this ​morning. We got stuck in traffic for several ​hours. New ​measures have been ​introduced to ​try and ​ease traffic congestion in the ​city. Five ​people were ​injured in a traffic accident (= one ​involvingvehicles).US I ​heard about the ​accident on the traffic report on the ​radio this ​morning. Air traffic has ​increased 30 ​percent in the last ​decade. people or ​goodstransported by ​road, ​air, ​train, or ​ship, as a ​business: The ​airlinehalveditsoverseasservice because of a ​sharpreduction in traffic. Environmental ​groupswant more passenger and freight traffic ​moved off the ​roads and onto ​trains.

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  • traffic noun [U] (TRADE)

illegaltrade: to ​cut down the traffic in ​drugs/the drug traffic Police are ​looking for ​ways of ​curbing the traffic inguns.

trafficverb

uk   us   /ˈtræf.ɪk/ (present participle trafficking, past tense and past participle trafficked)
[I] to ​buy and ​sellgoodsillegally: They were ​arrested for trafficking in the ​eggs of ​protectedspecies of ​birds. [T] to ​illegallybuy or ​sellpeople, or make ​money from ​work they are ​forced to do, such as ​sexwork: It is ​estimated that between 700,000 and 2 million women and ​children are trafficked ​globally each ​year.
trafficking
noun [U] uk   us   /-ɪ.kɪŋ/
arms/​drugs trafficking human/​people trafficking
(Definition of traffic from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"traffic" in Business English

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trafficnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈtræfɪk/
TRANSPORT all the ​vehicles that are on a road or all the ​aircraft, ​trains, or ​ships that are along a ​route or in an ​area at a particular ​time: air/rail/road traffic All ​commercialair traffic in the ​area has been ​cancelled. Rome has a ​videotrackingsysteminstalled to ​helpreduce traffic congestion. Banks ​studymigration and traffic ​trends in deciding where to ​locatebranches.
TRANSPORT, COMMERCE people or ​goodstransported by road, ​air, ​train, or ​ship, as a ​business: The ​loss of ​passenger and ​freight traffic to ​ferries and ​lowcostairlines have ​forced Eurotunnel to ​produce yet another ​recoveryprogramme.
IT the ​amount of ​datamoving between ​computers or ​systems at a particular ​time: We need a telecom ​infrastructure that can ​handle fast-growing internet traffic. They need to ​convert to ​broadband to cope with the ​growingvolume of ​data and voice traffic.
MARKETING the ​number of ​peoplebuyinggoods or using a ​service at a particular ​time: Many ​casinocompaniesproducedsolidearnings from ​heavy traffic during the New Year's ​holiday. The ​sites that are ​attracting traffic are ​professionalblogs.
the ​illegaltrade of ​goods or ​people: the brutal ​trade in ​human traffictraffic in/of sth Most of the traffic of narcotics is not detected.

trafficverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈtræfɪk/ (trafficking, trafficked)
to ​buy and ​sellgoods or ​peopleillegally: He ​pleaded no contest to trafficking 10,000 ​pounds of marijuana.traffic sb/sth somewhere An ​estimated 600,000 to 800,000 victims are trafficked across ​international borders each ​year.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of traffic from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“traffic” in Business English

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