treat Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “treat” - English Dictionary

"treat" in American English

See all translations

treatverb

 us   /trit/
  • treat verb (DEAL WITH)

[T always + adv/prep] to ​behave toward someone or ​deal with something in a ​particular way: He treated his ​childrenbadly. She always ​tried to treat her ​students as/like adults.
  • treat verb (GIVE MEDICAL CARE)

[T] to do something to ​improve the ​condition of an ​ill or ​injuredperson, or to ​try to ​cure a ​disease: The ​hospital treats hundreds of ​patients a ​day. The new ​drug may ​allow us to treat ​diabetes more ​effectively.
  • treat verb (PUT IN NEW CONDITION)

[T] to ​change the ​condition of a ​substance by ​adding something to it or putting it through a ​specialprocess: The ​sewage is treated with ​chemicals before being ​dumped.
  • treat verb (PAY FOR)

[I/T] to ​buy or ​pay for something for someone: [T] I’m going to treat myself to a new ​pair of ​sunglasses.

treatnoun

 us   /trit/
  • treat noun (SPECIAL EXPERIENCE)

[C] a ​special and ​enjoyableoccasion or ​experience: It was a ​real treat ​seeing my ​oldfriends last ​weekend.
  • treat noun (PAYMENT)

[U] an ​occasion on which you ​pay for someone's ​food or ​entertainment: You ​paid for the ​taxi, so ​lunch is my treat (= I will ​pay).
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"treat" in British English

See all translations

treatverb

uk   /triːt/  us   /triːt/
  • treat verb (DEAL WITH)

B2 [T usually + adv/prep] to ​behave towards someone or ​deal with something in a ​particular way: My ​parents treated us all the same when we were ​kids. He treated his ​wife very ​badly. It's ​wrong to treat ​animals as if they had no ​feelings. I treat ​remarks like that with the ​contempt that they ​deserve.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • treat verb (GIVE MEDICAL CARE)

B2 [T] to use ​drugs, ​exercises, etc. to ​cure a ​person of a ​disease or heal an ​injury: He is being treated for a ​rareskindisease. Westernmedicinetends to treat the ​symptoms and not the ​cause.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • treat verb (PUT ON)

[T] to put a ​specialsubstance on ​material such as ​wood, ​cloth, ​metal, etc. or put it through a ​specialprocess, in ​order to ​protect it from ​damage or ​decay: The ​material has been treated withresin to make it ​waterproof.

treatnoun

uk   /triːt/  us   /triːt/
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"treat" in Business English

See all translations

treatverb [T]

uk   us   /triːt/
to ​behave towards or ​think of someone or something in a particular way: treat sb/sth as sth We must treat ​employees as allies in ​achievingchange.treat sb/sth equally/fairly/unfairly It very hard to prove that the ​company had been treated ​unfairly.treat sb/sth like sth The ​company treated their ​initialpublicoffering more like a ​marketingopportunity than a capital-raising ​exercise.
to ​deal with something in a particular way: Each Fund is treated as a ​singletaxentity. The ​employmentdepartment said the ​unemploymentfigures should be treated withcaution.
PRODUCTION to put a ​special substance on something or put it through a ​specialprocess, in ​order to ​protect it, ​clean it, or make it ​safe: treat sth with sth We treat the ​material with resin to make it waterproof.
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of treat?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“treat” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

planet

an extremely large, round mass of rock and metal, such as Earth, or of gas, such as Jupiter, that moves in a circular path around the sun or another star

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More