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Definition of “truth” - English Dictionary

"truth" in American English

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truthnoun

us   /truθ/
  • truth noun (FACT)

[U] the actual fact or facts about a matter: Tell the truth, now, how did the chair get broken? We may never know the truth about what happened.
  • truth noun (QUALITY)

[U] the quality of being true: I can see some truth in what she said.
  • truth noun (PRINCIPLE)

[C] plural truths /truðz, truθs/ a statement or principle that is generally considered to be true: a scientific truth Our system of belief is based on a few simple truths.
(Definition of truth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"truth" in British English

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truthnoun

uk   /truːθ/ us   /truːθ/
B2 [U] the quality of being true: There would seem to be some truth in what she says. There is no truth in the reports of his resignation. You cannot question the truth of his alibi. And yet what he says contains at least a grain of (= a small amount of) truth.
the truth B1 [S]
the real facts about a situation, event, or person: But was he telling the truth? I don't suppose we'll ever know the truth about what happened that day. To tell (you) the truth (= speaking honestly) I'm happy he's not coming.
in truth formal
used to show or emphasize that something is true: In truth we feared for her safety, although we didn't let it be known.
C2 [C] formal a fact or principle that is thought to be true by most people: It would seem to be a general truth that nothing is as straightforward as it at first seems. The entire system of belief is based on a few simple truths.

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(Definition of truth from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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