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Definition of “turf” - English Dictionary

"turf" in American English

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turfnoun [U]

us   /tɜrf/
  • turf noun [U] (GRASS)

a surface layer of land consisting of grass and the earth in which its roots grow: Lush turf lined the river’s banks.
Turf is also ground cover that looks like grass: artificial turf
  • turf noun [U] (AREA)

infml the area that a person or group considers its own: Judges feel that the courtroom is their private turf. The fight over high-definition TV standards has been a turf war among the electronics, motion picture, and recording industries.
(Definition of turf from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"turf" in British English

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turfnoun

uk   /tɜːf/ us   /tɝːf/

turfverb [T]

uk   /tɜːf/ us   /tɝːf/
(Definition of turf from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"turf" in Business English

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turfnoun [U]

uk   /tɜːf/ us  
an area of activity in which a person or company has a lot of knowledge and experience and which they believe belongs to them: By launching a line in beauty products they are challenging the bigger company on its own turf. It was an unproductive meeting with everyone simply trying to defend their own turf.
come/go with the turf
used to say that someone should accept something because it is a necessary part of what they are doing: In this job customer complaints come with the turf. Of the fierce media attention he says: 'It goes with the turf'.
on home turf
in your own country, town, area, etc.: Export figures are good, but the company is losing sales on home turf.
(Definition of turf from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“turf” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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