turn Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “turn” - English Dictionary

Definition of "turn" - American English Dictionary

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turnverb

 us   /tɜrn/

turn verb (GO AROUND)

[I/T] to move or ​cause something to move in a ​circle around a ​centralpoint or ​line: [I] The ​earth turns on ​itsaxisonce every 24 ​hours. [T] She turned the ​doorknob and ​opened the ​door.

turn verb (CHANGE DIRECTION)

[I/T] to ​change the ​direction in which you are ​facing or ​moving, or to ​cause someone or something to ​face or move in a different ​direction: [I] They told us to turn ​right at the first ​trafficlight. [T] Turn ​yourhead this way so that you’re ​lookingright at the ​camera. [I] I turned to the ​person next to me and ​asked her what ​time it was. [T] The ​car turned (= went around) the ​corner. [I] fig. He ​feltdesperate and didn’t ​know where to turn for ​help. [I] I turned over (= ​changed how I was ​lying) and ​tried to ​sleep, but ​quickly gave up. [I/T] If you turn something or turn something over, you ​place the ​surface that was on ​top on the ​bottom: [T] He turned the ​pages of a ​magazine. [M] She turned the ​baby over onto his ​stomach.

turn verb (BECOME)

to ​become or ​cause to ​become, ​change, or come to be: [L] The ​weathersuddenly turned ​colder, and it ​started to ​rain. [I] By mid-September, the ​leaves are ​starting to turn (= ​changecolor). You say that someone turns a ​particularcolor when ​strongemotion or ​illnesscauses that person’s ​face to ​appearred, ​gray, ​yellow, etc: [L] He turned ​red with ​embarrassment. Turn is used with ​times and ​ages to show that a ​particularpoint has been ​reached or ​passed: [L] My little ​girl just turned six in ​February.

turn verb (SWITCH)

[always + adv/prep] to use a ​control to ​switch a ​piece of ​equipment on or off, or to ​adjust it to ​change the ​amount of what it is ​producing: [M] Please turn off/out the ​lights when you ​leave. [M] Who turned my ​computer on/off? [M] Turn the TV down (= make the ​soundquieter) – it’s too ​loud. [M] Turn up the ​volume – I can’t ​hear what they’re saying.

turn verb (TWIST)

[T] to ​damage the ​muscles in the ​foot by ​suddenly bending it too ​strongly: to turn ​yourankle

turn verb (MAKE ILL)

[I/T] to ​feel that you are going to ​vomit, or to ​causeyourstomach to ​feel this way: [I/T] The ​stench made my ​stomach turn.

turnnoun [C]

 us   /tɜrn/

turn noun [C] (OPPORTUNITY)

an ​opportunity or a duty to do something at a ​particulartime or in a ​particularorder, before or after other ​people: [+ to infinitive] It’s ​your turn to do the ​groceryshopping.

turn noun [C] (CHANGING DIRECTION)

a ​change in the ​direction in which you are ​moving or ​facing: Make a ​left turn at the next ​trafficlight.

turn noun [C] (GOING AROUND)

the ​act of causing something to move in a ​circle around a ​fixedpoint: This little ​wheel will ​shut off the ​water if you give it several turns.
(Definition of turn from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "turn" - British English Dictionary

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turnverb

uk   /tɜːn/  us   /tɝːn/

turn verb (GO ROUND)

B2 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​move in a ​circle around a ​fixedpoint or ​line: The ​earth turns onitsaxisonce every 24 ​hours. She turned on her ​toes, ​holding out her ​skirt. The ​wheelsstarted to turn (around). Turn the ​steeringwheel as ​quickly as you can. She turned the ​doorknob and ​quietlyopened the ​door. Slowly, I turned the ​doorhandle.
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turn verb (CHANGE DIRECTION)

A2 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​change the ​direction in which you are ​facing or ​moving: Turn ​right at the ​trafficlights. The ​path twists and turns for the next ​halfmile. We have to turn down/into/up the next ​road on the ​right. Plants ​tend to turn towards the ​source of ​light. She turned to ​face him. He turned round and ​waved to us. He turned on his ​heel (= turned ​quickly to ​face the ​oppositedirection) and ​left the ​room. The ​person on my ​left turned to me and ​whispered "Not another ​speech!" His ​wifetried to ​speak to him, but he turned his back (on her)/turned away (from her) (= ​moved so that his back, not his ​face, was towards her to show his ​anger). At about three o'clock, the ​tidestarted to turn (= the ​seastarted to come ​closer to or ​move away from the ​beach). He turned his ​head to me to ​listen. I'll just turn the ​car round and go back the way we came. We ​watched until the ​car had turned (= gone around) the ​corner. The ​army turned ​theirguns on (= ​pointed them at and ​started to ​shoot at) the ​protesters. She can turn (= ​perform) a somersault.
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turn verb (CHANGE POSITION)

B1 [I or T] to ​move, or to ​move an ​object or ​page, so that a different ​side or ​surface is on the ​top: Now turn the ​page, ​please, and ​startwork on Exercise 2. She turned the ​vase over to ​look for the ​price. He turned over two or three ​pages. She put out the ​light, turned over (= ​rolled in ​order to ​face in another ​direction) and went to ​sleep. Now turn to (= ​open the ​book at)page 23 and ​look at the first ​paragraph.
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turn verb (BECOME)

B2 [L, I or T usually + adv/prep] to (​cause to) ​become, ​change into, or come to be something: The ​weather has ​suddenly turned ​cold. When I ​refused to ​pay, he turned ​nasty. She turned ​pale and ​started to ​shiver. The ​mood of the ​meeting turned ​solemn when the ​extent of the ​problembecameknown. The ​companiesworked well together for a while, but ​eventually the ​relationship turned ​sour (= ​becamebad). Keele, ​popstar turned ​businesstycoon, has ​launched a new ​range of ​cosmetics. The ​dryweather turned the ​soil into/toconcrete. By the end of ​September, the ​leaves have ​started to turn (= ​becomebrown). Her ​attitude turned frompolitelyinterested toenthusiastic during the ​course of ​ourconversation.turn 16, nine o'clock, etc. C1 to ​become a ​particularage or ​time: She turned 18 last ​year. It's just turned ten o'clock.
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turn verb (SWITCH)

A2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to use a ​control to ​switch a ​piece of ​equipment or a ​power or ​watersupply on or off, or to ​increase or ​reduce what it is ​producing: Turn off/out the ​light. Who turned the TV on? I ​asked him to turn down the ​heating. Turn the ​sound up - I can't ​hear what they're saying. The ​heater turns off (= can be ​switched off) using this ​switch.
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turn verb (TWIST)

turn your ankle old-fashioned to ​damage the ​muscles in the ​foot by ​suddenlytwisting it too ​strongly: She turned her ​ankle on the ​rocks and had to ​hobble back to ​camp.

turn verb (WOOD)

[T] specialized engineering to ​shape a ​piece of ​wood while it is ​attached to a ​machine that spins it: a turned ​bowl

turnnoun

uk   /tɜːn/  us   /tɝːn/

turn noun (TIME TO DO STH)

B1 [C] an ​opportunity or a ​duty to do something at a ​particulartime or in a ​particularorder, before or after other ​people: Is it my turn ​yet? [+ to infinitive] I ​waited so ​long for my turn tosee the ​careersadviser that I ​missed my ​bus. It's ​your turn to do the ​dishes! In this ​game if you give the ​wronganswer you have to miss a turn.
Compare
take turns B2 (UK also take it in turn(s)) When a ​number of ​people take turns, they do the same thing one after the other: We take turns ​answering the ​phone.in turn C1 (also by turns) one after the other in an ​agreedorder: Each of us ​takes a ​break in turn.
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turn noun (GO ROUND)

[C] an ​action that ​causes something to ​move in a ​circle round a ​fixedpoint: Give the ​screw a ​couple of turns to make ​sure it's ​tight.
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turn noun (CHANGE IN DIRECTION)

B2 [C] a ​change in the ​direction in which you are ​moving or ​facing: When you ​see the ​school on the ​left, make a ​right turn. The ​path was ​full of twists and turns.on the turn Something that is on the turn is about to ​changedirection: The ​tide is on the turn.the turn of sth C2 the ​point at which something ​changes or ​moves in a different ​direction: the turn of the ​tide She was ​born around the turn of the ​century (= around 1900, 2000, etc.).
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turn noun (DEVELOPMENT)

take a ... turn to ​develop in a ​particular way: The ​battle for ​control of the ​company took an ​interesting turn today. Events took an ​unexpected turn when her ​mothersuddenlyarrived.take a turn for the better/worse C2 to ​suddenlybecomebetter or ​worse: Their ​relationship took a turn for the ​worse when he ​lost his ​job.

turn noun (PERFORMANCE)

[C] UK a ​stageact or ​performance: The first ​couple of turns were ​childrensinging and ​dancing.

turn noun (ILLNESS)

[C] old-fashioned informal a ​slightillness, a ​strangefeeling, or a ​nervousshock: After the ​accident I ​started having ​funny turns. It gave me ​quite a turn to ​see him after all these ​years.
(Definition of turn from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "turn" - Business English Dictionary

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turnverb [I or T]

uk   us   /tɜːn/
to ​change into something or make something ​change into something: turn sth into sth These ​machines can turn a ​computerdesign into a ​3-Dprototype in ​minutes. With some wise ​internettrading, he ​managed to turn $68,000 into $100,000 in three ​years.
to ​change direction, or to make something ​change direction: The first ​quarter could see a further ​decline in ​retailcustomers, though ​executives said they were confident the ​trend will turn.turn negative/positive Sales are expected to turn ​positive in the first ​quarter of next ​year. turn ​higher/​lower
turn sth on its head to make something the ​opposite of what it was previously: The ​internet turned the ​world of ​flightbooking on its ​head.
turn a profit FINANCE to make a ​profit: The ​business was set up five ​years ago but is still ​struggling to turn a ​profit.
turn sth to your advantage to ​find a way of getting something ​positive out of a ​badsituation: Experienced ​long-terminvestors can turn an ​economicdownturn to their ​advantage.
turn your back on sth to ​refuse to be involved in something that you were previously involved in: He said the country could not turn its back on ​globalization.

turnnoun

uk   us   /tɜːn/
[S] FINANCE, ECONOMICS a ​change in the way something such as ​prices, ​rates, or the ​economy is ​behaving: It is too early to know whether the ​economy has ​reached a turn in the ​cycle.take a turn for the better/worse Media ​stocks took a turn for the better.bad/downward/upward turn The ​figures have taken a ​downward turn.
[C] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET the ​profit from an ​investment: The ​shares were ​picked up by ​investors looking to make a quick turn on their ​money.
[C] STOCK MARKET, FINANCE the difference between a trader’s ​buyingprice and ​sellingprice for particular ​shares, ​currencies, etc.
See also
(Definition of turn from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“turn” in Business English

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