Definition of “unlike” - English Dictionary

“unlike” in British English

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unlikepreposition

uk /ʌnˈlaɪk/ us /ʌnˈlaɪk/

unlike preposition (DIFFERENT FROM)

B2 different from:

Dan's actually very nice, unlike his father.
Unlike you, I'm not a great dancer.

More examples

  • She was a small, dainty child, unlike her sister who was large and had big feet.
  • Man's ability to talk makes him unlike any other animal.
  • I really enjoyed the film - it was unlike anything I'd seen before.
  • Tom's a rather shy child, unlike his younger brother!
  • The village fete went well, unlike the previous year when very few people came.

unlike preposition (NOT TYPICAL)

C2 not typical or characteristic of:

It's unlike you to be quiet - is something wrong?

More examples

  • Jackie must be worried about something, it's unlike her to be so tense.
  • It's unlike you to not want any pudding - are you feeling okay?
  • It's unlike Sam to be late.
  • It's unlike you to be so outspoken.
  • I was rather surprised by Guy's outburst - it's very unlike him.

unlikeverb [ T ]

uk /ʌnˈlaɪk/ us /ʌnˈlaɪk/

(Definition of “unlike” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“unlike” in American English

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unlikepreposition

us /ʌnˈlɑɪk/

unlike preposition (DIFFERENT FROM)

different from:

Unlike you, I’m not a great dancer.

unlike preposition (NOT TYPICAL)

not typical or characteristic of:

It’s unlike Debbie to be so late.

(Definition of “unlike” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)