value Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “value” - English Dictionary

Definition of "value" - American English Dictionary

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valuenoun

 us   /ˈvæl·ju/

value noun (IMPORTANCE)

[U] importance, ​worth, or ​benefit: They ​discussed the value of having ​cameras in the ​courtroom. The value of the thing (= ​itsworth in ​money) was ​probably only a few ​dollars but it had ​greatsentimental value.

value noun (MONEY)

[C/U] the ​amount of ​money that can be ​received for something; the ​worth of something in ​money: [C] a ​decline in ​property values [U] The value of the ​dollarfell against the ​mark and the ​yenyesterday.

value noun (NUMBER)

mathematics /ˈvæl·ju/ [C] the ​number or ​amount that a ​letter or ​symbolrepresents

value noun (ART)

art /ˈvæl·ju/ [C] the ​degree of ​light or ​darkness in a ​color, or the ​relation between ​light and ​shade in a ​work of ​art

valueverb [T]

 us   /ˈvæl·ju/

value verb [T] (MONEY)

to ​state the ​worth of something: The ​painting was valued at $450,000.

value verb [T] (IMPORTANCE)

to ​consider something as ​important and ​worth having: I value his ​friendship more than I can ​ever say.
(Definition of value from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "value" - British English Dictionary

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valuenoun

uk   us   /ˈvæl.juː/

value noun (MONEY)

B1 [C or U] the ​amount of ​money that can be ​received for something: She had already ​sold everything of value that she ​possessed. What is the value of the ​prize? The value of the ​pound fell against other ​Europeancurrenciesyesterday. Property values have ​fallen since the ​plans for the ​airport were ​published.UK I ​thought the ​offer was good value (for ​money) (= a lot was ​offered for the ​amount of ​moneypaid).US I ​thought the ​offer was a good value (= a lot was ​offered for the ​amount of ​moneypaid).
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value noun (IMPORTANCE)

[S or U] the ​importance or ​worth of something for someone: For them, the house's ​main value ​lay in ​itsquietcountrylocation. They are ​known to place/put/set a high value on good ​presentation.B1 [U] how ​useful or ​important something is: The ​photographs are ofimmensehistorical value. His ​contribution was of little or no practical value. The ​necklace had ​great sentimental value. It has novelty value because I've never done anything like it before.values [plural]
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B2 the ​beliefspeople have, ​especially about what is ​right and ​wrong and what is most ​important in ​life, that ​controltheirbehaviour: family/​moral/​traditional values
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valueverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈvæl.juː/

value verb [T] (MONEY)

C2 UK (US appraise) to give a ​judgment about how much ​money something might be ​sold for: He valued the ​painting at $2,000. The ​insurancecompany said I should have my ​jewellery valued.
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value verb [T] (IMPORTANCE)

B2 to ​consider something ​important: I've always valued her ​advice.
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(Definition of value from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "value" - Business English Dictionary

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valuenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈvæljuː/
the ​amount of ​money that something is ​worth: This ​mortgage is ​available for up to 95% of the property's value.go up/shoot up/increase in value One-bedroom ​flats have shot up in value by 71%.go down/drop/fall in value My ​investment has gone down in value.a high/low value The rupiah has ​climbed to its ​highest value against the ​dollar since early May.
how good or useful something is in relation to its ​price: excellent/good/poor value Property will always remain good value.give/offer/provide value If you're taking more than one ​trip a ​year, ​annualtravelinsurancepoliciesoffer excellent value. These jogsuits are ​outstanding value for ​money at a greatly ​reducedprice.
values [plural] the beliefs that ​people have about what is ​right, wrong, and most important in ​life, ​business, etc. which ​control their ​behaviour: He believed that ​culture and values helped ​hold the ​company together.core/shared values Companies that last are ​built on a ​central set of ​core values.cultural/social/traditional values The ​changesindicated a ​return to the traditional values of ​localmanagement.

valueverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈvæljuː/
to ​judge how much ​money something is ​worth: Soft ​assets are hard to value. A ​tried and ​tested way of valuing ​companies is looking at ​cashflow.value sth at sth The ​property is valued at $160,000.
to consider something important or good: We value our ​partnership with the ​government.value sb/sth for sth Plastic ​manufacturers value this polymer for its ​ability to withstand high temperatures.

valueadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˈvæljuː/
COMMERCE produced to ​sell at a ​lowprice: There has been a ​positivereception to its new value ​range of kitchen ​products. The ​productsrange from $100 single-barrel bourbons to value ​brands that ​sell for $10 a bottle or less.
(Definition of value from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“value” in Business English

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