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Definition of “vault” - English Dictionary

"vault" in American English

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vaultnoun [C]

 us   /vɔlt/
  • vault noun [C] (ARCH)

a ​type of ​arch that ​supports a ​roof or ​ceiling, esp. in a ​church or ​publicbuilding, or a ​ceiling or ​roofsupported by several of these ​arches
  • vault noun [C] (ROOM)

a ​room, esp. in or under the ​groundfloor of a ​largebuilding, that is used to ​store things ​safely: The ​museumkeeps many of ​itstreasures in temperature-controlled ​storage vaults.
In a ​bank, a vault is where ​money, ​jewelry, ​importantdocuments, etc., are ​locked for ​protection.

vaultverb [I/T]

 us   /vɔlt/
to ​jump over something: [I/T] He vaulted (over) the ​gate.
To vault is also to move someone ​suddenly to a much ​higher or more ​importantposition: [T] The ​speech vaulted him into the ​nationalspotlight.
(Definition of vault from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"vault" in British English

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vaultnoun [C]

uk   /vɒlt/  us   /vɑːlt/
  • vault noun [C] (ARCH)

a ​type of arch that ​supports a ​roof or ​ceiling, ​especially in a ​church or ​publicbuilding, or a ​ceiling or ​roofsupported by several of these ​arches
  • vault noun [C] (ROOM)

(UK also vaults) a ​room, ​especially in a ​bank, with ​thickwalls and a ​strongdoor, used to ​storemoney or ​valuable things in ​safeconditions: a bank vault She ​entered the vault with an ​armedguard.
a ​room under a ​church or a ​smallbuilding in a ​cemetery where ​deadbodies are ​buried: She was ​buried in the family vault.

vaultverb

uk   /vɒlt/  us   /vɑːlt/
[I usually + adv/prep, T] to ​jump over something by first putting ​yourhands on it or by using a ​pole: He vaulted over the ​gate. She vaulted the ​wall and ​keptrunning. He has vaulted 6.02 m in ​indoor competitions this ​year.
See also
[T] formal to ​move someone or something ​suddenly to a much more ​importantposition: Last week's ​changes vaulted the ​general to the ​top, over the ​heads of several of his ​seniors.
(Definition of vault from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"vault" in Business English

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vaultnoun [C]

uk   us   /vɔːlt/
a ​room with thick walls and a ​strong door, which is used to safely ​storemoney, ​valuable things, etc.: Buyers often ​storegold in a bank vault. The ​storage vaults will be able to ​store 100,000 ​metrictons of ​gas.

vaultverb

uk   us   /vɔːlt/
[T] to ​move someone suddenly to a more important ​position: His impressive ​fundraising vaulted him into the ​toptier of ​candidates.
[I] to ​move suddenly to a ​higherlevel or a more important ​position: vault to sth In June, ​gasoline vaulted 3.01 ​cents to 66.04 ​cents a ​gallon.vault into sth Can these ​smallfirms vault into the ​big league?
(Definition of vault from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“vault” in Business English

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