Definition of “venture” - English Dictionary

“venture” in English

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venturenoun [ C ]

uk /ˈven.tʃər/ us /ˈven.tʃɚ/

C2 a new activity, usually in business, that involves risk or uncertainty:

She advised us to look abroad for more lucrative business ventures.
There are many joint ventures between American and Japanese companies.

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ventureverb [ I usually + adv/prep, T ]

uk /ˈven.tʃər/ us /ˈven.tʃɚ/ formal

C2 to risk going somewhere or doing something that might be dangerous or unpleasant, or to risk saying something that might be criticized:

She rarely ventured outside, except when she went to stock up on groceries.
As we set off into the forest, we felt as though we were venturing (forth) into the unknown.
She tentatively ventured the opinion that the project would be too expensive to complete, but the boss ignored her.

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(Definition of “venture” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“venture” in American English

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venturenoun [ C ]

us /ˈven·tʃər/

an activity or plan of action, often in business, that involves risk or uncertainty:

His most recent business venture ended in bankruptcy.

ventureverb [ I/T ]

us /ˈven·tʃər/

to risk going somewhere or doing something that might be dangerous or unpleasant:

fml To venture something is to attempt it when you are likely to be wrong or to be criticized:

[ T ] I wouldn’t venture an opinion about that.

(Definition of “venture” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“venture” in Business English

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venturenoun [ C ]

uk /ˈventʃər/ us

a new business activity:

business/commercial venture The firm is looking overseas for more lucrative business ventures.
The total value of venture investments increased to $5.6 billion in the second quarter.
The American car giant and its venture partner in China are investing millions of dollars to explore ways of reducing reliance on petrol.
create/form/set up a venture
finance/fund/invest in a venture
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ventureverb

uk /ˈventʃər/ us

[ I + adverb/prep ] to start a new activity, start thinking in a new way, or start doing an activity in a new place:

venture into sth There are some excellent deals for new investors venturing into the electronic marketplace.
Meanwhile, the insurer has ventured beyond insurance with the launch of its first unsecured personal loan last week.
The company has finally decided to venture overseas.

[ T ] to say something when it is risky to do this:

venture a guess/opinion/judgement I don't have enough knowledge to venture a judgement.
I was too shy to venture a comment.

(Definition of “venture” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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venture

I think that venture capital offers concrete ways in which we can contribute to the development of the companies which are in the process of innovating.
Women, religious minorities and intellectuals who venture even the faintest criticism of current policy become victims of blatant repression and brutal persecution.
The signing of the joint memorandum has already received a favourable response from researchers, universities and entrepreneurs, particularly with regard to venture capital.
How can we imagine being able to create the world' s most competitive economic area unless we venture to free up competition within the area?
Clear rules will encourage both businesses and consumers to venture across a border and provide or purchase services in another country with peace of mind.
I do not see that this is proportionate to the issues and that the funds likely to be used in this venture would be better used elsewhere.
How much has this speculative venture cost us to date and how much is it likely to cost us in the next 18 months?
One of the most important findings was that, according to rating procedures, banks required up to 400% more deposit for venture financing and start-ups.
If the banks' practice of requiring personal guarantees from individuals is highly debatable, it is quite unacceptable where venture capital businesses are concerned.
I am of the opinion that one should only venture to propose changes to the policy on the basis of correct, clear data.