very Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “very” - English Dictionary

Definition of "very" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

veryadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ˈver·i/

very adverb [not gradable] (EXTREMELY)

(used to ​addemphasis to an ​adjective or ​adverb) to a ​greatdegree, or ​extremely: I was ​working very hard, but I ​enjoyed it. It’s very ​easy to ​findourhouse. She was a very good ​teacher. People didn’t like him very much.
Idioms

veryadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈver·i/

very adjective [not gradable] (EXACT)

(used to ​addemphasis to a ​noun) ​exact or ​particular: I’d ​heardstories about him and now here he was, the very ​person I now ​accompanied. This very ​moment was what he had been ​waiting for. He ​found the ​missingpaper at the very ​bottom of the ​pile.
(Definition of very from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "very" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

veryadverb

uk   us   /ˈver.i/
A1 (used to ​addemphasis to an ​adjective or ​adverb) to a ​greatdegree or ​extremely: The ​situation is very ​serious. We're very, very ​sorry about what's ​happened. Think about it very ​carefully before ​deciding. How very ​childish of her to ​refuse to ​speak to me! "Are you ​tired?" "No, not very." Thank you very much. "Did you ​enjoy the ​play?" "Very much so." (= Yes.) I can't very well (= it would not be ​right for me to) say ​sorry when I didn't do anything ​wrong. used to ​addforce to a superlativeadjective or to the ​adjectives "own" or "same": This is the very bestchocolatecake I've ​evertasted. She always ​leaves her ​homework to the very lastmoment. We now have ​our very ownlibrary in the ​village. This is the very same (= ​exactly the same)place we ​sat the last ​time we came.
More examples
Grammar

veryadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˈver.i/

very adjective [before noun] (EXACT)

C2 (used to ​addemphasis to a ​noun) ​exact or ​particular: This is the very ​book I've been ​looking for all ​month. You're the very ​person we need for the ​job. What ​ended up ​happening was the very thing we ​feared the most. The ​letter was ​sent on ​Monday from Berlin and ​arrived in Hamburg the very same/nextday. The very idea/​thought of having her ​friends to ​stayfills me with ​dread.
More examples

very adjective [before noun] (FURTHEST POINT)

used to ​describe or ​emphasize the ​furthestpoint of something: He ​found the ​piece of ​paper he had ​lost at the very bottom of the ​pile. We were at the very end of the ​queue, so we didn't ​manage to get any ​tickets.
(Definition of very from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of very?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

harvest

to pick and collect crops, or to collect plants, animals, or fish to eat

Word of the Day

Meerkat meme
Meerkat meme
by Colin McIntosh,
September 03, 2015
Meerkats are not new to popular culture (they appear in the folk tales of the San people of the Kalahari), but their arrival in the public’s consciousness, at least in the UK and the US, is a relatively recent phenomenon. Meerkats are small, sociable Southern African mammals that live in large family

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More