Definition of “vested interest” - English Dictionary

“vested interest” in British English

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vested interestnoun

uk /ˌves.tɪd ˈɪn.tər.est/ us /ˌves.tɪd ˈɪn.t̬ɚ.est/

(Definition of “vested interest” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“vested interest” in American English

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vested interestnoun [ C ]

/ˈves·tɪd ˈɪn·trəst, ˈɪn·tər·əst/

an interest in influencing something so that you can continue to benefit from it:

She said the port has a vested interest in protecting the community's environment.

A vested interest is also a person or group who has this type of relationship with something:

The British vested interests didn't regulate their own industries, as the Chinese state firms do.

(Definition of “vested interest” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“vested interest” in Business English

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vested interestnoun [ C ]

uk us

a strong reason for supporting a particular action which will give you a personal or financial advantage:

a vested interest in sth Leaks about a possible merger were traced back to the companies with a vested interest in the deal.
The majority faction has a vested interest in taking part in the election.
vested interests [ plural ] disapproving

people or organizations with a financial or personal advantage in a system, situation, etc., used especially when they refuse to allow changes to it that would cause them to lose this advantage:

The bond market and other vested interests fought plans to tighten the tax loopholes.
Strong vested interests can keep a counter-productive policy going almost indefinitely.

(Definition of “vested interest” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)