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Definition of “walk” - English Dictionary

"walk" in American English

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walkverb [I/T]

 us   /wɔk/
to move along by putting one ​foot in ​front of the other, or to move a ​distance in this way: [I] I walked ​home. [I] We just walked past a ​famousactress. [I] They walked all around ​Chinatown. [I] I walk to ​work every ​morning. [T] It’s not that ​far – you can walk it in ​half an ​hour. [T] We must have walked ​miles today.
To walk someone to a ​particularplace is to walk with the ​person until the ​place has been ​reached: [T] He ​offered to walk her ​home.
To walk an ​animal, esp. a ​dog, is to ​bring it ​outside with you to walk.
walk all over someone phrasal verb
to be ​unkind to someone and ​treat that ​person without ​respect: You shouldn’t ​let him walk all over you like that.
walk away/off with something phrasal verb
to ​win something ​easily: The ​Germansoccerteam is ​once again ​favored to walk away with the ​championship.
walk off with something phrasal verb
to take something without ​asking: Who walked off with my ​drink?
walk out phrasal verb
to ​leave an ​event before it is ​finished because you are not ​enjoying it or because you do not ​agree with it: It was such a ​badmovie that I ​felt like walking out in the first fifteen ​minutes.
If ​workers walk out, they go on ​strike (= ​stopworking at ​theirjobs in ​order to ​express a ​complaint): Airline ​pilots are ​threatening to walk out next ​week.
walk out on someone/something phrasal verb
to ​suddenly end ​yourrelationship or ​involvement with someone or something: You can't ​afford to walk out on ​yourjob.
walk (someone) through something phrasal verb
to ​practice something, or to show someone how to do something from ​beginning to end: They can walk you through the ​process one more ​time, to give you some ​practice and ​confidence.

walknoun [C]

 us   /wɔk/
an ​act of ​moving along by putting one ​foot in ​front of the other, or ​moving a ​distance in this, esp. for ​pleasure or ​exercise: He went for/took a walk around the ​block.
(Definition of walk from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"walk" in British English

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walkverb

uk   /wɔːk/  us   /wɑːk/
  • walk verb (MOVE ON FOOT)

A1 [I or T] to ​move along by putting one ​foot in ​front of the other, ​allowing each ​foot to ​touch the ​ground before ​lifting the next: I walked ​home. A ​cat was walking along the ​top of the ​fence. He walks two ​miles to ​work every ​morning.
See also
B1 [T] to go with someone to a ​particularplace, for ​example because you ​want to ​protect them from ​danger, or show them the way: He ​offered to walk her ​home/to the ​station.
B1 [T] to take an ​animal, ​especially a ​dog, for a walk: She walks the ​dog for an ​hour every ​afternoon.
a walking disaster, encyclopedia, etc.
someone who ​seems to be a ​humanform of ​disaster, ​encyclopedia, etc.: You ​broke another ​pair of ​glasses? You're just a walking ​disaster!

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  • walk verb (FREE TO GO)

[I] to be ​allowed to ​leave a ​court after being ​found not ​guilty of a ​crime: If ​police don't get the ​rightevidence, he'll walk.
[I or T] in baseball, to ​receive four ​ballsoutside the ​hittingarea and be ​allowed to go to first ​base, or to ​throw the ​balloutside the ​hittingarea four ​times so that the batter is ​allowed to go to first ​base: The first ​batters either ​missed or walked. He would have had a ​perfectgame, except he walked a ​batter in the ​finalinning.

walknoun

uk   /wɔːk/  us   /wɑːk/
A2 [C] a ​journey that you make by walking, often for ​enjoyment: He went for/took a walk around the ​block, to get some ​air. They went on a ten-mile walk to ​raisemoney for ​charity. Every ​afternoon she ​takes her ​grandfather out for a walk.
C1 [C] a ​path or ​route where ​people can walk for ​enjoyment: Do you ​know any ​nice walks around here?
[S] a way of walking: He has a ​strangewaddlingsort of walk.
[S] walking ​speed: She ​slowed the ​horses to a walk.
a short, five-minute, ten-minute, etc. walk
a ​journey that ​takes a ​shorttime, five ​minutes, ten ​minutes, etc. when you walk: The ​school is only a five-minute walk away.
[C] in baseball, an ​occasion when a batter is ​allowed to go to first ​base after the pitcher has ​thrown the ​balloutside the ​hittingarea four ​times

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(Definition of walk from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"walk" in Business English

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walkverb [I or T]

uk   us   /wɔːk/
walk all over sb informal
to ​treat someone badly: The ​unionsaccusedmanagement of walking all over their ​staff.
walk off the job US
to ​stopworking because you are angry or unhappy about something: Autoworkers walked off the ​job after the ​unionsfailed to ​reach an ​agreement over ​pay.
walk the plank informal
to be ​forced to ​leave your ​job because of something ​bad you have done: The ​expensesscandal gave several ​ministers no ​option but to walk the plank.
walk the talk informal
to do the things you have said you would do, especially when you ​reach a ​position of ​power: Business ​groups are waiting to see if the ​incomingGovernor will walk the ​talk on promises to ​boost the state's ​economy.
walk the walk informal
to do the things you have ​planned and promised to do: The country has yet to see whether the new ​leader can walk the walk.

walknoun [C]

uk   us   /wɔːk/
walk of life
used to refer to the ​job you do or the ​part of ​society you belong to: We ​employpeople from all walks of ​life.
(Definition of walk from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“walk” in Business English

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