wave Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “wave” - English Dictionary

Definition of "wave" - American English Dictionary

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waveverb [I/T]

 us   /weɪv/

wave verb [I/T] (MOVE)

to ​raiseyourhand and move it from ​side to ​side as a ​greeting, or to get someone's ​attention or give ​information: [I] She ​leaned out the ​window and waved (good-bye). [M] As ​soon as we ​showedourpapers as journalists, the ​policeman waved us in (= moved his ​hand to ​allow us to go in). If you wave something or something waves, you move it from ​side to ​side while ​holding it in the ​hand, or something ​else moves it in this way: [T] He was very ​excited and ​rushed into the ​room waving a ​piece of ​paper. [I] Flags waved in the ​breeze.

wavenoun [C]

 us   /weɪv/

wave noun [C] (WATER MOVEMENT)

a ​raisedmovement of ​waterrollingacross the ​surface esp. of the ​sea: We were so ​close we could ​hear the waves ​breaking on the ​beach. A wave is also a ​suddenincrease in an ​activity or in the ​strength of a ​condition or ​feeling: A wave of ​emotionswept through her as she ​visited her ​hometown.

wave noun [C] (ENERGY FORM)

physics the ​continuous, ​repeatingpattern in which some ​types of ​energy, such as ​sound, ​light, and ​heat, are ​spread or ​carried: electromagnetic waves

wave noun [C] (MOVE)

a ​movement of ​yourraisedhand from ​side to ​side or up and down as a ​greeting or ​goodbye, or to get someone's ​attention or give ​information: She ​looked at him for a ​longtime, and then, with a wave of her ​hand, she was off.
(Definition of wave from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "wave" - British English Dictionary

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waveverb [I or T]

uk   us   /weɪv/

wave verb [I or T] (MOVE HAND)

B1 to ​raiseyourhand and ​move it from ​side to ​side as a way of ​greeting someone, ​telling someone to do something, or ​addingemphasis to an ​expression: I waved to/at him from the ​window but he didn't ​see me. I was waving my ​hand like ​mad but he never ​oncelooked in my ​direction. She was so ​annoyed she wouldn't ​even wave us goodbye/wave ​goodbye to us. She waves her ​hands about/around a lot when she's ​talking.wave sb away, on, etc. to make a ​movement with ​yourhand that ​tells someone to ​move in a ​particulardirection: You'll have to ​wait till the ​policeman waves the ​car on. You can't just wave me away as if I were a ​child!
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wave verb [I or T] (MOVE REPEATEDLY)

C1 to ​move from ​side to ​side, or to make something ​move like this while ​holding it in the ​hand: The ​corn waved ​gently in the ​summerbreeze. A ​crowd of ​peopleran down the ​street waving ​banners. He ​seems to ​think I can wave a ​magicwand and everything will be all ​right.

wave verb [I or T] (CURL HAIR)

If ​hair waves, it ​curlsslightly: If she ​leaves her ​hair to ​dry on ​its own, it just waves ​naturally.

wavenoun [C]

uk   us   /weɪv/

wave noun [C] (WATER)

B1 a ​raisedline of ​water that ​movesacross the ​surface of an ​area of ​water, ​especially the ​sea: At ​night, I ​listened to the ​sound of the waves breaking/​crashing against the ​shore.
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wave noun [C] (HAND MOVEMENT)

C2 the ​action of ​raisingyourhand and ​moving it from ​side to ​side as a way of ​greeting someone, etc.: Give Grandpa a wave.

wave noun [C] (BY A CROWD)

the Wave US (UK Mexican wave) a wave-like ​movement made by a ​crowdwatching a ​sportsgame, when everyone ​stands and ​lifts up ​theirarms and then ​sits down again one after another: The ​crowd did the Wave.

wave noun [C] (ENERGY)

B2 the ​pattern in which some ​types of ​energy, such as ​sound, ​light, and ​heat, are ​spread or ​carried: radio waves
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wave noun [C] (LARGE NUMBER)

C2 a ​larger than ​usualnumber of ​events of a ​similar, often ​bad, ​type, ​happening within the same ​period: a ​crime wave The ​country was ​swept by a wave ofprotests.a new, second, etc. wave of sth an ​activity that is ​happening again or is being ​repeated after a ​pause: A new wave of ​joblosses is ​expected this ​year.
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wave noun [C] (STRONG FEELING)

C2 A wave of an ​emotion or ​feeling is a ​suddenstrongfeeling that gets ​stronger as it ​spreads: A wave ofpanicswept through the ​crowd.
See also

wave noun [C] (HAIR CURVES)

a ​series of ​slightcurves in a person's ​hair: Your ​hair has a ​natural wave, but mine's just ​straight.
See also
(Definition of wave from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "wave" - Business English Dictionary

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wavenoun [C]

uk   us   /weɪv/
a larger than usual ​number of ​events of a similar, often ​bad, ​type, ​happening within the same ​period: a wave of sth During the ​recession there was a wave of ​bankruptcies and ​massunemployment. a crime wave
the ​pattern in which some ​types of ​energy, such as ​sound, ​light, and ​heat, are ​spread or ​carried: light/sound/radio waves Large ​amounts of ​data is ​transmitted via ​light waves inside fiberoptic ​cables.
make waves to do things that make ​peoplenotice you, often in a way that causes trouble: Sometimes, an ​employeefeels intimidated by ​workplace bullying, but, they don't want to make waves.
(Definition of wave from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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