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Definition of “wear” - English Dictionary

"wear" in American English

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wearverb

 us   /weər/ (past tense wore  /wɔr, woʊr/ , past participle worn  /wɔrn, woʊrn/ )
  • wear verb (COVER THE BODY)

[T] to have clothing or jewelry on your body: He wears glasses for reading. fig. The prisoner wore a confident smile throughout the trial.
[T] To wear your hair in a particular style is to have it arranged in a certain way: She wears her hair in a ponytail.
  • wear verb (WEAKEN)

[I/T] to make something become weaker, damaged, or thinner because of continuous use: [I] My favorite shirt wore at the collar. [T] I wore a hole in my favorite sweater. [M] Wind and water slowly wore away the mountain’s jagged peak, making it round.

wearnoun [U]

 us   /wer, wær/
  • wear noun [U] (COVER FOR THE BODY)

clothes designed for a particular use or of a particular type: She designed sportswear and very elegant evening wear.
(Definition of wear from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"wear" in British English

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wearverb

uk   /weər/  us   /wer/ (wore, worn)
  • wear verb (ON BODY)

A1 [T] to have clothing, jewellery, etc. on your body: Tracey is wearing a simple black dress. What are you wearing to Caroline's wedding? Some musicians don't like to wear rings when they're playing. He wears glasses for reading. She wears very little make-up.
B2 [T] to arrange your hair in a particular way: When she's working she wears her hair in a ponytail. You should wear your hair up (= so that it does not hang down) more often - it suits you.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • wear verb (WEAKEN)

[I] to become weaker, damaged, or thinner because of continuous use: I really like this shirt but it's starting to wear at the collar. The wheel bearings have worn over the years, which is what's causing the noise.
[T usually + adv/prep] to produce something such as a hole or loss of material by continuous use, rubbing, or movement: I always seem to wear a hole in the left elbow of my sweaters. Over many years, flowing water wore deep grooves into the rock. Wind and water slowly wore down the mountain's jagged edges.

wearnoun [U]

uk   /weər/  us   /wer/
(Definition of wear from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wear" in Business English

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wearnoun [U]

uk   us   /weər/
COMMERCE clothes suitable for a particular use: children's/men's/women's wear Women's wear is on the first floor. evening/casual/formal wear
the act of wearing something: The company manufactures shoes for everyday wear.
the amount or type of use an object has had or can be expected to have: A new extended wear contact lens is now available. The material is washable and resistant to heavy wear.
the damage or reduction in quality that an object shows after it has been used for a period of time: Gear knobs can show signs of wear on high-mileage vehicles.
See also
(Definition of wear from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“wear” in Business English

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