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Definition of “weave” - English Dictionary

"weave" in American English

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weaveverb

us   /wiv/
  • weave verb (MAKE CLOTH)

[I/T] past tense wove /woʊv/ weaved, past participle woven /ˈwoʊ·vən/ weaved to make cloth by repeatedly passing a single thread in and out through long threads on a loom (= special frame): [T] How long does it take to weave three yards of cloth?
[I/T] past tense wove /woʊv/ weaved, past participle woven /ˈwoʊ·vən/ weaved You can also weave dried grass, leaves, and thin branches into hats, containers, and other items.
  • weave verb (MOVE)

[always + adv/prep] past tense and past participle weaved to frequently change direction while moving forward, esp. to avoid things that could stop you: [I] The taxi weaved through traffic to get us to the airport.

weavenoun [C]

us   /wiv/
  • weave noun [C] (MAKING CLOTH)

the way in which cloth has been woven: The blanket has a loose weave.
(Definition of weave from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"weave" in British English

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weaveverb

uk   /wiːv/ us   /wiːv/
  • weave verb (MAKE)

[I or T] wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved to make cloth by repeatedly crossing a single thread through two sets of long threads on a loom (= special frame): This type of wool is woven into fabric which will make jackets.
[T] wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved to twist long objects together, or to make something by doing this: We were shown how to roughly weave ferns and grass together to make a temporary shelter. It takes great skill to weave a basket from/out of rushes.
[T] literary wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved to form something from several different things or to combine several different things, in a complicated or skilled way: The biography is woven from the many accounts which exist of things she did.
weaver
noun [C] uk   /ˈwiː.vər/ us   /ˈwiː.vɚ/
a person whose job is weaving cloth and other materials: basket weavers
weaving
noun [U] uk   /ˈwiː.vɪŋ/ us   /ˈwiː.vɪŋ/
There has been increasing automation of spinning and weaving.

weavenoun

uk   /wiːv/ us   /wiːv/
  • weave noun (HAIR)

[C] a piece of hair that is added to a person's own hair in order to make the hair thicker or longer: To recreate Alexander the Great's mane of hair, the actor had blonde dye and a weave.
(Definition of weave from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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