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Definition of “welcome” - English Dictionary

"welcome" in American English

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welcomeverb [T]

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/
  • welcome verb [T] (MEET)

to meet or speak to someone in a friendly way when that person comes to the place where you are: We went next door to welcome our new neighbors. The prime minister of Canada welcomed the president warmly.
  • welcome verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to be pleased about or support something: Baseball fans welcomed the end of the playersstrike. She welcomed the opportunity to explain herself.
welcome
noun [C]  us   /ˈwel·kəm/
We were given a warm welcome.

welcomeadjective

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/
  • welcome adjective (SUPPORTED)

"You’re welcome" is a polite answer when someone thanks you: "Thanks for taking care of our cat." "You’re welcome."
  • welcome adjective (MET)

(of someone who visits) received in a friendly way: You’ll always be welcome here.
(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"welcome" in British English

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welcomeverb [T]

uk   /ˈwel.kəm/  us   /ˈwel.kəm/
  • welcome verb [T] (ENCOURAGE)

B2 to be pleased about and encourage or support something: The new appointment has been widely welcomed.

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  • welcome verb [T] (MEET)

B1 to meet and speak to someone in a friendly way when they arrive: The visitors were warmly welcomed by the head of the department. Browning stood at the door, welcoming newcomers with a large smile and a pat on the arm. Please welcome (= please clap for) our guest of honour, George Taylor.

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welcomeadjective

uk   /ˈwel.kəm/  us   /ˈwel.kəm/
  • welcome adjective (MEETING)

B1 If someone is welcome, you are pleased when they visit you: Come and see us whenever you're in town - you're always welcome/you'll always be welcome. Their tradition is that the traveller is a welcome guest.
make sb welcome
B1 to show someone that you are pleased that they are with you: The restaurant makes children very welcome.

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  • welcome adjective (PLEASED)

B2 If something is welcome, you are pleased to have or do it: The holiday was a welcome change/break/relief. She offered him the welcome chance/opportunity to do something different. A nice cup of tea would be very welcome.
be welcome to do sth
B1 used to tell someone that they can certainly do something: Anyone who is interested is welcome to come along.

welcomenoun

uk   /ˈwel.kəm/  us   /ˈwel.kəm/
  • welcome noun (MEETING)

B1 [C or U] the way in which someone is met and spoken to when they arrive in a place: They were given a warm (= very friendly) welcome. The leader of the political protests returned to a hero's/heroine's welcome after seven years in exile. She referred to his previous visit in her speech of welcome/welcome speech.
outstay your welcome
C2 mainly UK (US usually overstay your welcome) to stay too long: I left after two days - I didn't want to outstay my welcome.

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  • welcome noun (REACTION)

[S] a reaction to a decision or suggestion: Their supporters gave the decision a guarded/cautious welcome.

welcomeexclamation

uk   /ˈwel.kəm/  us   /ˈwel.kəm/
A2 said as a greeting to someone arriving at a place: Welcome - please come in. Welcome home/back - we've missed you! Welcome to Cambridge.

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(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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