welcome Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “welcome” - English Dictionary

Definition of "welcome" - American English Dictionary

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welcomeverb [T]

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/

welcome verb [T] (MEET)

to ​meet or ​speak to someone in a ​friendly way when that ​person comes to the ​place where you are: We went next ​door to welcome ​our new ​neighbors. The ​primeminister of Canada welcomed the ​presidentwarmly.

welcome verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to be ​pleased about or ​support something: Baseball ​fans welcomed the end of the ​players’ ​strike. She welcomed the ​opportunity to ​explain herself.
welcome
noun [C]  us   /ˈwel·kəm/
We were given a ​warm welcome.

welcomeadjective

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/

welcome adjective (SUPPORTED)

"You’re welcome" is a ​politeanswer when someone ​thanks you: "Thanks for taking ​care of ​ourcat." "You’re welcome."

welcome adjective (MET)

(of someone who ​visits) ​received in a ​friendly way: You’ll always be welcome here.
(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "welcome" - British English Dictionary

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welcomeverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome verb [T] (ENCOURAGE)

B2 to be ​pleased about and ​encourage or ​support something: The new ​appointment has been ​widely welcomed.
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welcome verb [T] (MEET)

B1 to ​meet and ​speak to someone in a ​friendly way when they ​arrive: The ​visitors were warmly welcomed by the ​head of the ​department. Browning ​stood at the ​door, welcoming ​newcomers with a ​largesmile and a ​pat on the ​arm. Please welcome (= ​pleaseclap for)ourguest of ​honour, George Taylor.
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welcomeadjective

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome adjective (MEETING)

B1 If someone is welcome, you are ​pleased when they ​visit you: Come and ​see us ​whenever you're in ​town - you're always welcome/you'll always be welcome. Their ​tradition is that the ​traveller is a welcome guest.make sb welcome B1 to show someone that you are ​pleased that they are with you: The ​restaurant makes ​children very welcome.
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welcome adjective (PLEASED)

B2 If something is welcome, you are ​pleased to have or do it: The ​holiday was a welcome change/​break/​relief. She ​offered him the welcome chance/​opportunity to do something different. A ​nicecup of ​tea would be very welcome.be welcome to do sth B1 used to ​tell someone that they can ​certainly do something: Anyone who is ​interested is welcome to come along.

welcomenoun

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome noun (MEETING)

B1 [C or U] the way in which someone is ​met and ​spoken to when they ​arrive in a ​place: They were given a warm (= very ​friendly) welcome. The ​leader of the ​politicalprotestsreturned to a hero's/heroine's welcome after seven ​years in ​exile. She referred to his ​previousvisit in her speech of welcome/welcome speech.outstay your welcome C2 mainly UK (US usually overstay your welcome) to ​stay too ​long: I ​left after two ​days - I didn't ​want to ​outstay my welcome.
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welcome noun (REACTION)

[S] a ​reaction to a ​decision or ​suggestion: Their ​supporters gave the ​decision a ​guarded/​cautious welcome.

welcomeexclamation

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/
A2 said as a ​greeting to someone ​arriving at a ​place: Welcome - ​please come in. Welcome home/back - we've ​missed you! Welcome to Cambridge.
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(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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