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Definition of “window” - English Dictionary

"window" in American English

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windownoun [C]

 us   /ˈwɪn·doʊ/
  • window noun [C] (OPENING)

an opening in the wall of a building or vehicle, usually covered with glass, to let light and air in and to allow people inside to see out: to open/close a window From her bedroom window she could see a lovely garden.
In a store, a window is the large glass-covered front behind which goods for sale are usually shown: We walked along Fifth Avenue, looking in the shop windows.
A window is also a period when there is an unusual opportunity to do something: If a window of opportunity presents itself, I’d be a fool not to take advantage of it.
  • window noun [C] (COMPUTER)

(Definition of window from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"window" in British English

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windownoun

uk   /ˈwɪn.dəʊ/  us   /ˈwɪn.doʊ/
  • window noun (GLASS)

A1 [C] a space usually filled with glass in the wall of a building or in a vehicle, to allow light and air in and to allow people inside the building to see out: Is it all right if I open/close the window? He caught me staring out of the window. I saw a child's face at the window. She has some wonderful plants in the window (= on a surface at the bottom of the window). I was admiring the cathedral's stained-glass windows. Have you paid the window cleaner (= person whose job is to clean the outside of windows)? window frames a window ledge
[S] literary something that makes it possible for you to see and learn about a situation or experience that is different from your own: The film provides a window on the immigrant experience.
[C] a transparent rectangle on the front of an envelope, through which you can read the address written on the letter inside
[C] the decorative arrangement of goods behind the window at the front of a shop, in addition to the window itself: How much is the jacket in the window? The shop windows are wonderful around Christmas time.

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(Definition of window from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"window" in Business English

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windownoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈwɪndəʊ/
IT one of the separate areas that can be opened and moved around on a computer screen to use particular programs: The information appeared in a new window. click on/close/open a window maximize/minimize/move a window enlarge/reduce a window
Compare
a short period in between other activities when there is an opportunity to do something: I have a window on Thursday morning, so we could meet then. The difficult economic conditions provide a window of opportunity for longterm investors.
COMMERCE the large area of glass at the front of a store behind which goods are displayed: Could I try on the dress in the window? Stores don't tend to put anything above a size 8 in their window displays.
(Definition of window from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“window” in Business English

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