wing Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “wing” - English Dictionary

Definition of "wing" - American English Dictionary

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wingnoun [C]

 us   /wɪŋ/

wing noun [C] (STRUCTURE FOR FLYING)

one of the ​movable, usually ​long and ​flat, ​parts on either ​side of the ​body of a ​bird, ​insect, or bat that it uses for ​flying, or one of the ​long, ​flat, ​horizontalstructures that ​stick out on either ​side of an ​aircraft: The ​duckflappedits wings and took off.

wing noun [C] (POLITICAL GROUP)

a ​group within a ​politicalparty or ​organization whose ​beliefs are in some way different from those of the ​maingroup: She’s in the ​conservative wing of the ​party.

wing noun [C] (PART OF BUILDING)

a ​section of a ​largebuilding that ​connects to a ​side of the ​mainpart: His ​office is in the ​west wing of the ​WhiteHouse.
(Definition of wing from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "wing" - British English Dictionary

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wingnoun [C]

uk   us   /wɪŋ/

wing noun [C] (FOR FLYING)

B1 the ​flatpart of the ​body that a ​bird, ​insect, or bat uses for ​flying, or one of the ​flat, ​horizontalstructures that ​stick out from the ​side of an ​aircraft and ​support it when it is ​flying: the ​delicacy of a butterfly's wings I don't like ​chicken wings - there's not much ​meat on them. I could ​see the plane's wing out of my ​window.take wing literary If a ​birdtakes wing, it ​flies away. to ​suddenlydevelop, ​freely and ​powerfully: She ​walked in the ​hills, ​letting her ​thoughts take wing.on the wing literary A ​bird that is on the wing is ​flying.
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wing noun [C] (POLITICAL GROUP)

C2 a ​group within a ​politicalparty or ​organization whose ​beliefs are in some way different from those of the ​maingroup: The ​president is on the left wing of the Democratic ​party. The ​extreme right wing of the ​party has ​dominated the ​discussion.
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wing noun [C] (PART OF BUILDING)

a ​part of a ​largebuilding that ​sticks out from the ​mainpart, often having been ​added at a ​laterdate: The ​maternitydepartment will be in the new wing of the ​hospital. The ​west wing of the ​house is still ​lived in by ​Lord and ​Lady Carlton, while the ​rest of the ​house is ​open to the ​public.

wing noun [C] (PART OF CAR)

UK (US fender) one of the four ​parts at the ​side of a ​car that go over the ​wheels: There's a ​dent in the ​left wing. Look in ​your wing mirror.

wing noun [C] (SPORTS)

(in ​variousteamgames, such as ​football and hockey) either of the two ​sides of the ​sportsfield, or a ​player whose ​position is at either of the two ​sides of the ​field: Zinoli ​passes the ​ball to Pereira out there on the wing. He ​played left/​right wing for Manchester United.

wing noun [C] (THEATRE)

the wings [plural] the ​sides of a ​stage that cannot be ​seen by the ​peoplewatching the ​play: I was in the wings ​waiting for my ​cue to come on ​stage.

wingverb

uk   us   /wɪŋ/ informal
wing it to ​perform or ​speak without having ​prepared what you are going to do or say: I didn't have ​time to ​prepare for the ​talk, so I just had to wing it.
(Definition of wing from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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