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Definition of “wise” - English Dictionary

"wise" in American English

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wiseadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /wɑɪz/
having or showing good judgment, or the ability to make good judgments, based on what you have learned from your experience: a wise man/woman [+ to infinitive] They decided that it was wiser to wait until they were making a little more money before buying a house.
wisely
adverb  /ˈwɑɪz·li/
Spend your money wisely.

-wisesuffix

 us   /ˌwɑɪz/
relating to: Moneywise, of course, I’m much better off than I used to be.
(Definition of wise from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"wise" in British English

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wiseadjective

uk   /waɪz/  us   /waɪz/
B2 approving having or showing the ability to make good judgments, based on a deep understanding and experience of life: I think you made a wise choice. "I never drink more than three glasses of wine." "How wise." Looking at the weather, I think we made a wise decision not to go to the coast this weekend. I think it would be wiser to wait and see how much money you have left before you make any decisions. I never used to save money but now I'm a little older and wiser I can see the point of it. Was it Thomas More who said that the wise man learns from the experience of others?
wise to sth informal
understanding a dishonest situation or way of doing something: People are getting wise to the tricks politicians use in campaign advertisements.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

-wisesuffix

uk   / -waɪz/  us   / -waɪz/
(Definition of wise from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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