withdraw Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “withdraw” - English Dictionary

Definition of "withdraw" - American English Dictionary

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withdrawverb [I/T]

 us   /wɪθˈdrɔ, wɪð-/ (past tense withdrew  /wɪθˈdru, wɪð-/ , past participle withdrawn  /wɪθˈdrɔn, wɪð-/ )
to take something back, or to ​remove something: [T] He ​asked that his ​name be withdrawn from ​nomination for a Golden Globe ​Award. [T] Democrats threatened to withdraw (= ​stop giving)theirsupport of the ​taxbill. [T] I have to withdraw (= take out) some ​money from an ​ATMmachine.
(Definition of withdraw from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "withdraw" - British English Dictionary

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withdrawverb

uk   /wɪðˈdrɔː/  us   /-ˈdrɑː/ (withdrew, withdrawn)

withdraw verb (REMOVE)

C1 [I or T] to take or ​move out or back, or to ​remove: This ​creditcardallows you to withdraw up to £200 a ​day from ATMs. The UN has withdrawn ​itstroops from the ​country. Eleven million ​bottles of ​water had to be withdrawn from ​saledue to a ​healthscare. Once in ​court, he withdrew the ​statement he'd made to the ​police (= he ​claimed it was ​false). All ​charges against them were withdrawn after the prosecution's ​casecollapsed.formal After ​lunch, we withdrew into her ​office to ​finishourdiscussion in ​private. She had to withdraw from the ​competition because of a ​leginjury. Following his ​nervousbreakdown, he withdrew frompubliclife and ​refused to give any ​interviews.
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withdraw verb (STOP CONTACT)

[I] to ​stoptalking to other ​people and ​startthinkingthoughts that are not ​related to what is ​happening around you: As a ​child, she ​frequently withdrew into her own ​fantasyworld. After the ​accident, he withdrew into himself and ​refused to ​talk to ​family or ​friends.
(Definition of withdraw from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "withdraw" - Business English Dictionary

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withdrawverb

uk   us   /wɪðˈdrɔː/ (withdrew, withdrawn)
[T] BANKING to take ​money out of an ​account: This ​accountallows you to withdraw a ​maximumdailyamount of $500.withdraw cash/funds/savings The ​economiccrisis saw ​people queuing to withdraw their ​savings.
[T] COMMERCE to ​stopselling a ​product or ​offering a ​service, usually because of a problem or ​fault: The ​product was withdrawn from the ​market on ​safetygrounds. The ​brewery said there was no ​connection between their decision to withdraw one of their ​local beers and the ​dispute with their ​maincompetitor.
[T] to ​remove something that you previously ​agreed to ​provide: withdraw funding/support The opposition threatened to withdraw ​support for the government's ​pensionplans.withdraw an application/bid/offer Morgan Stanley withdrew the ​joboffer.
[I] to ​stop being involved in a ​situation, having a particular ​responsibility, or belonging to an ​organization: withdraw from (doing) sth Despite the ​stockmarketcrash, only one ​corporateinvestor has withdrawn from the ​deal.withdraw as sth He withdrew as a ​candidate for the ​Democratic presidential ​nomination.
[T] to tell ​peopleofficially that something you said earlier is not ​true or ​correct: withdraw a remark/claim/statement She was ​advised to withdraw her ​statement. The Foreign ​Office withdrew ​advice to holidaymakers not to ​travel to some ​areas in the Far East. withdraw an accusation/​allegation/​complaint
(Definition of withdraw from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“withdraw” in Business English

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