Definition of “wood” - English Dictionary

“wood” in British English

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woodnoun

uk /wʊd/ us /wʊd/

wood noun (MATERIAL)

A2 [ C or U ] a hard substance that forms the branches and trunks of trees and can be used as a building material, for making things, or as a fuel:

He gathered some wood to build a fire.
She attached a couple of planks of wood to the wall for shelves.
Mahogany is a hard wood and pine is a soft wood.
The room was heated by a wood-burning stove.

[ C ] a type of golf club (= long, thin stick) with a rounded wooden end, used for hitting the ball over long distances:

He likes to use a number 2 wood to tee off.

More examples

  • He was chopping wood in the yard.
  • The house was built of wood but faced with brick.
  • A flute is made of wood or metal in three jointed sections.
  • In cheap furniture, plastic is often used to simulate wood.
  • Screw this piece of wood to the wall.

wood noun (GROUP OF TREES)

A2 [ C ] also woods [ plural ] an area of land covered with a thick growth of trees:

an oak wood
We went for a walk in the woods after lunch.
See also

More examples

  • The wood lies on the southern extremity of the estate.
  • The cottage is situated in the middle of a wood at the end of a narrow potholed lane.
  • From the top of the hill we could see our house and the woods beyond.
  • The police searched the woods for the missing boy.
  • We go for a ramble through the woods every Saturday.

woodadjective

uk /wʊd/ us /wʊd/

(Definition of “wood” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“wood” in American English

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woodnoun

us /wʊd/

wood noun (HARD MATERIAL)

[ C/U ] the hard substance that forms the inside part of the branches and trunk of a tree, used to make things or as a fuel:

[ C ] He makes tables and other things from different kinds of wood.

wood noun (GROUP OF TREES)

[ C ] woods:

Beyond them lay a dense wood.

(Definition of “wood” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)