word Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “word” - English Dictionary

Definition of "word" - American English Dictionary

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wordnoun

 us   /wɜrd/

word noun (LANGUAGE UNIT)

[C] a ​singleunit of ​language that has ​meaning and can be ​spoken or written: The word "​environment" ​means different things to different ​people. She ​spoke so ​fast I couldn’t ​understand a word (= anything she said).

word noun (BRIEF STATEMENT)

[C usually sing] a ​briefdiscussion or ​statement: Could I have a word with you? Let me give you a word of ​advice. Tell us what ​happened in your own words (= say it in ​your own way).

word noun (NEWS)

[U] news or a ​message: We were ​excited when word of the ​discoveryreached us.

word noun (PROMISE)

[U] a ​promise: You have my word – I won’t ​tell a ​soul. She wouldn't give me her word if she didn't ​mean to ​keep it.

word noun (ORDER)

[C usually sing] an ​order or ​request: If you ​want me to ​leave, just say/give the word.
worded
adjective [not gradable]  us   /ˈwɜrd·əd/
a ​strongly worded ​letter

wordverb [T always + adv/prep]

 us   /wɜrd/

word verb [T always + adv/prep] (LANGUAGE UNIT)

to ​choose the words with which to ​express something: His ​description was ​carefullyworded to ​covervariouspossibilities.
(Definition of word from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "word" - British English Dictionary

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wordnoun

uk   /wɜːd/  us   /wɝːd/

word noun (LANGUAGE UNIT)

A1 [C] a ​singleunit of ​language that has ​meaning and can be ​spoken or written: Your ​essay should be no more than two thousand words ​long. Some words are more ​difficult to ​spell than ​others. What's the word forbikini in ​French? It's sometimes ​difficult to findexactly the ​right word to ​express what you ​want to say.the F-word, C-word, etc. used to refer to a word, usually a ​rude or ​embarrassing one, by saying only the first ​letter and not the ​whole word: You're still not ​allowed to say the F-word on TV in the US So how's the ​diet going - or would you ​rather I didn't ​mention the d-word?
More examples

word noun (TALKING)

B2 [S] a ​shortdiscussion or ​statement: The ​managerwants a word. Could I have a word (with you) about the ​salesfigures? Could you have a ​quiet word with Mike (= ​gentlyexplain to him) about the ​problem?words [plural] angry words: Both ​competitors had words (= ​argued) after the ​match. Words were exchanged (= ​peopleargued) and then someone ​threw a ​punch. disapproving discussion, ​rather than ​action: So ​far there have been more words than ​action on the ​matter of ​childcareprovision.have/exchange words to ​talk to each other for a ​shorttime: We ​exchanged a few words as we were coming out of the ​meeting.a good word a ​statement of ​approval and ​support for someone or something: If you ​see the ​captain could you put in a good word for me? The ​critics didn't have a good word to say about the ​performance.
More examples
  • Could I have a word with you in ​private?
  • Incidentally, I ​wanted to have a word with you about ​yourexpensesclaim.
  • Can I have a little word with you?
  • When you've got a ​minute, I'd like a ​brief word with you.
  • Could I have a ​quick word ?

word noun (NEWS)

[U] news or a ​message: Has there been any word from Paul since he went to New York? We got word of ​theirplan from a ​formercolleague. Word of the ​discoverycaused a ​stir among ​astronomers.

word noun (PROMISE)

[S] a ​promise: I said I'd ​visit him and I will keep my word. You have my word - I won't ​tell a ​soul.

word noun (ORDER)

[S] an ​order: We're ​waiting for the word from ​headoffice before making a ​statement. The ​troops will go into ​action as ​soon as ​theircommander gives the word. At a word from ​theirteacher, the ​childrenstarted to put away ​theirbooks.

wordverb [T usually + adv/prep]

uk   /wɜːd/  us   /wɝːd/
to ​choose the words you use when you are saying or writing something: He worded the ​reply in such a way that he did not ​admit making the ​originalerror.
See also
worded
adjective uk   /ˈwɜː.dɪd/  us   /ˈwɝː-/
a carefully/​strongly worded statement
(Definition of word from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "word" - Business English Dictionary

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wordnoun [C]

uk   us   /wɜːd/
words and figures differ (also words and figures do not agree) BANKING, MONEY →  amounts differ
words per minute →  wpm
(Definition of word from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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