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English definition of “follow”

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follow

verb
 
 
/ˈfɒləʊ/
GO [I, T] A2 to move behind someone or something and go where they go, sometimes secretly: She followed me into the kitchen. He employed a private detective to follow his wife.Pursuing
HAPPEN [I, T] B1 to happen or come after something: The weeks that followed were the happiest days of my life. There was a bang, followed by a cloud of smoke.Occurring and happening
follow a path/road, etc B1 to travel along a path/road, etc: Follow the main road down to the traffic lights.Travelling
follow instructions/orders/rules, etc B1 to do what the instructions/orders/rules, etc say you should do: I followed your advice and stayed at home.Obedient and compliantObeying and breaking the law
follow sb's example/lead to copy someone's behaviour or ideas: You should follow Meg's example and tidy your room.Copying and copiesForgery
UNDERSTAND [I, T] B1 to understand something: Could you say that again? I didn't quite follow.Understanding and comprehending
BE INTERESTED [T] to be interested in an event or activity: I followed the trial closely.Excited, interested and enthusiastic
as follows B2 used to introduce a list or descriptionQuoting and making references
it follows that used to say that if one thing is true, another thing will also be true: He's big, but it doesn't follow that he's strong. →  See also follow in sb's footsteps , follow suit Concluding and deducing
(Definition of follow from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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