interest noun Definition in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “interest” - Learner’s Dictionary

interest

noun     /ˈɪntrəst/
FEELING [U, no plural]
B1 the feeling of wanting to give attention to something or discover more about it: Mark had an interest in the media and wanted to become a journalist. After a while he simply lost interest in (= stopped being interested) his studies. Bindi felt that her father didn't take much of an interest in her (= he was not very interested).Excitement, interest, energy and enthusiasm
ACTIVITY/SUBJECT [C]
B1 something you enjoy doing, studying, or experiencing: We share a lot of the same interests, particularly music and football.Pastimes - general words
MONEY YOU PAY [U]
B2 the extra money that you must pay to a bank, company, etc which has lent you money: low interest rates Savings, interest and capitalBanks and bank accounts
MONEY YOU EARN [U]
B2 the money you earn from keeping your money in a bank accountSavings, interest and capital
QUALITY [U]
B1 a quality that makes you think something is interesting: Would this book be of any interest to you? The tour offers a chance to visit places of interest.Excitement, interest, energy and enthusiasm
ADVANTAGE [C, U]
something that gives someone or something an advantage: A union looks after the interests of its members.Useful or advantageous
be in sb's interest(s)
to help someone and give them an advantage: It may not be in your interests to change jobs so soon.Advantage and disadvantage
in the interest(s) of sth
in order to achieve a particular situation or quality: In the interest of safety, passengers are advised to wear their seat belts at all times.Causing things to happen
LEGAL RIGHT [C] formal
the legal right to own or receive part of a building, company, profits, etc →  See also self-interest , vested interest Belongings and possessions
(Definition of interest noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More