piece Definition in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Definition of “piece” - Learner’s Dictionary


noun [C]
AMOUNT/PART A2 an amount of something, or a part of something: a piece of paper/wood She cut the flan into eight pieces. Some of the pieces seem to be missing. These shoes are falling to pieces (= breaking into pieces). Words meaning parts of things
ONE A2 one of a particular type of thing: a useful piece of equipment It's a beautiful piece of furniture.Objects - general words
SOME B1 some of a particular type of thing: a piece of news/information Can I give you a piece of advice?Words meaning small pieces and amountsWords meaning parts of things
ART/WRITING, ETC B2 an example of artistic, musical, or written work: There was an interesting piece on alternative medicine in the paper yesterday. He's got two pieces on show in the Summer exhibition.Art and culture
ten-/twenty-, etc pence piece a coin with a value of ten/twenty, etc pence (= British money) : Have you got any twenty-pence pieces for the parking meter?British money
→  See also set-piece , be a piece of cake , give sb a piece of your mind , go/fall to pieces
(Definition of piece from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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